Cultural Psychology

Cultural Psychology : Essays on Comparative Human Development

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This book raises the idea of a distinct discipline of cultural psychology, the study of the ways that psyche and culture, subject and object, and person and world make up each other. Cultural Psychology is a collection of essays from leading scholars in anthropology, psychology, and linguistics who examine these relationships with special reference to core areas of human development: cognition, learning, self, personality dynamics, and gender. The chapters critically examine such questions as: Is there an intrinsic psychic unity to humankind? Can cultural traditions transform the human psyche, resulting less in psychic unity than in ethnic divergences in mind, self, and emotion? Are psychological processes local or specific to the sociocultural environments in which they are embedded? The volume is an outgrowth of the internationally known Chicago Symposia on Culture and Human Development. It will appeal to an interdisciplinary audience of anthropologists, psychologists, linguists, historians, philosophers and hermeneutists interested in the prospects for a distinct discipline of cultural psychology.show more

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"...this volume is an important contribution to the history of ideas in human development." American Ethnologist "...the ambition of the book is laudable, and it should be praised for setting that goal so high..." Paul L. Harris, Current Anthropology "...required reading for anyone interested in the interrelationship of culture and the human psyche. It is rich in data and exciting ideas." William Irons, Zygonshow more

Table of contents

Preface; Cultural psychology - what is it? Richard A. Shweder; Part I. The Keynote Addresses: 1. On the strange and the familiar in recent anthropological thought Melford E. Spiro; Part II. Cultural Cognition: 2. Some propositions about the relations between culture and human cognition Roy D'Andrade; 3. Culture and moral development Richard A. Shweder, Manamohan Mahapatra and Joan G. Miller; 4. The laws of sympathetic magic: a psychological analysis of similarity and contagion Paul Rozin and Carol Nemeroff; 5. The development from child speaker to naive speaker Dan I. Slobin; Part II. Cultural Learning: 6. The socialization of cognition: what's involved? Jacqueline J. Goodnow; 7. Indexicality and socialization Elinor Ochs; 8. The culture of acquisition and the practice of understanding Jean Lave; 9. Mathematics learning in Japanese, Chinese, and American classrooms James W. Stigler and Michelle Perry; Part IV. Cultural Selves: 10. Adolescent rituals and identity conflicts John W. M. Whiting; 11. Sambia nosebleeding rites and male proximity to women Gilbert Herdt; 12. On self characterization Vincent Crapanzano; Part V. Cultural Conceptions of Psychoanalysis: 13. Stories from Indian psychoanalysis: context and text Sudhir Kakar; 14. The cultural assumptions of psychoanalysis Takeo Doi; 15. Infant environments in psychoanalysis: a cross-cultural view Robert A. LeVine; Part VI. Cultural Domination and Dominions: 16. Male dominance and sexual coercion Thomas Gregor; 17. The children of Trackton's children: spoken and written language in social change Shirley Brice Heath; 18. Cultural mode, identity, and literacy John U. Ogbu; 19. Mother love and child death in northeast Brazil Nancy Scheper-Hughes; Part VII. A Skeptical Reflection: 20. Social understanding and the inscription of self Kenneth J. Gergen; Name index; Subject index.show more

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