A Critical Examination of the Text of Shakespeare; With Remarks on His Language and That of His Contemporaries, Together with Notes on His Plays and

A Critical Examination of the Text of Shakespeare; With Remarks on His Language and That of His Contemporaries, Together with Notes on His Plays and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...I have observed elsewhere.) Midsummer Nig-ht's Dream, iii. 1, p. 153, col. 1, --" Your name I beseech you sir? Mus. Mustard-seede. Peas. Pease-blossome." The last is a mere repetition; see a few lines above. Merchant of Venice, v. 1, p. 182, col. 2, l. 6, --" Clown. Tel him----ere morning sweet soule. Loren. Let 's in," &c., for, --" Clown. Tel him ere morning. Loren. Sweet soule, let 's in," &c. As You Like It, i. 1, p. 186, col. 1, the concluding speech of the scene has no name prefixed to it. 2, p. 187, col. 1, --" Ros. My Fathers loue is enough," &c. for Gel. (For my knowledge of this erratum I was indebted to Dyce's Remarks, p. 60.) ii. 3, p.190, col. 2, Orlando's speech, " Why what 's the matter?" forms the conclusion of that of Adam which precedes it. Taming of the Shrew, iii. 1, p. 218, col. 2, from " How fiery and forward " to " thus pleasant with you both," the speeches are in a complete tangle. iv. 2, p. 222, col. l, l. ult., names prefixed to speeches, --Luc. Hor. Bian. Hor. for Hor. Luc. Bian. Luc. All 's Well, &c. ii. 4, p. 239, col. 2, near the bott0m, --" O20. Did you-finde me? Clo/l'he search," &c. these two speeches being in fact one. The same thing has happened, ii. 3, p. 237, ult. and 238, init. iv. 3, p. 247, col. 2, --"Par. Do, Ile take the Sacrament on 't, how and which way you will: all 's one to him." The last four words belong to Bertram, or possibly to one of the two Lords. v. 3, p.251, col. 2, the two lines, " Which better then the first," &c. form part of the King's speech, but belong in reality to the Countess....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236538722
  • 9781236538727
  • 2,335,244