A Critical Dissertation Upon Homer's Iliad; Where, Upon Occasion of This Poem, a New System of the Art of Poetry Is Attempted, Founded Upon the Principles of Reason, and the Examples of the Most Illustrious Poets, Both Ancient Volume 2

A Critical Dissertation Upon Homer's Iliad; Where, Upon Occasion of This Poem, a New System of the Art of Poetry Is Attempted, Founded Upon the Principles of Reason, and the Examples of the Most Illustrious Poets, Both Ancient Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1725 edition. Excerpt: ...him three several Times. " Let me stop here a little, continues (bey " the better to explain the Beauty of these Characters, because there is not " the least Stroke contain'd in them, u which does not deserve particularly to " be studied; and that this is the Pare " wherein Poets generally most fail, for want of having sufficiently consider'd " these excellent Originals, which are " only capable of directing and con" ducting them aright." But instead of all these Remarks of Madam JD.I shou'd have thought this whole Subject might have been dispatch'd in one Word. If Thunder, in Homer, signifies only a natural Effect, or is only an equivocal and ambiguous Omen, as it seems to be by a Passage in B. 15. (/. 368.) where the Trojans falfly explain and apply it in their own Favour; Agamemnon, Nestor., Idomeneus, and the two A j axes, shew themselves Cowards in flying, especially in such Fright and Confusion, as that Homer attributes to them, (Q. 8. p. 39, and and 41.) but if Thunder was a manifest Sign of the contrary Will and Pleasure of Jupiter, Diomedes is then a mad, or rather impious Person, not to retire till a more favourable Opportunity. Tis rather to omit nothing unmentioned, than to fay here any thing neeeslary, that I stop a Moment to shew the Difference between this Resistance of Diomedes to Jupiter, from that of Jacob wrestling with the Angel, which is on this Occasion in Madam D's Preface, (p. 1 j.) for it appears clearly from the Text of Scripture, that this Wrestling was an advantagious Sign and Proof to Jacob himself, and a Type and Symbor of the Success, that the Zeal and Ardency of his Prayers, had with God: In the fame Manner as is faid in the Gos. pel, ' (Matth. xi. 1 2.) That the Kingdom ofHeaven suffer eth Violence, and the Violent...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236657136
  • 9781236657138