A Critical Analysis of Several Striking and Incongruous Passages in Madame de Stael's Work on Germany [De L'Allemagne] with Some Historical Accounts of That Country. by a German

A Critical Analysis of Several Striking and Incongruous Passages in Madame de Stael's Work on Germany [De L'Allemagne] with Some Historical Accounts of That Country. by a German

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1814 edition. Excerpt: ...are all incorrigible idiots. But we allow ourselves to affirm, that whatever influence a metropolis, society, or emulation may have in other countries, on intellectual productions, it cannot excel the power which a tribunal of critics exercise in Germany on literature. Every pretension to literary fame, which is not Vol. i. p. 239-t Vol. ii. p. 363,36. justified by talents and genius, is immediately repelled by their decisive anathemas, which are almost as much dreaded by writers, as were formerly the bloody decrees of that secret tribunal, which our author mentions in her work. In the year 1760, some of the most erudite men then living, as Lessing, Nicolai, Mendelsohn, &c. began the publication of a paper which they called The Universal Literary Gazette, in which all new works were reviewed with the most scrupulous minuteness; a minuteness which it is easier to ridicule than to imitate. It ascertains, at any rate, whether the critic has had a perfect knowledge of the subject on which he has been expatiating; and it evinces, at the same time, the diligence with which he has been perusing the work under his discussion. Whereas, if a critic allows himself to signify his disapprobation of a work in general terms, or his admiration per authoritatem, he may be apt to bias the judgment of the reader, but he will never be able to guide or enlighten it. A critic must prove the validity of his decrees, by quoting passages t Vol. ii. p. 13.9. which have occasioned those decrees. He has no right to claim implicit faith, where he is expected to give palpable conviction. Minute criticism, which does not scorn to dwell even on trifling errors, will expel vague expletives and ambiguous sentences from polite literature, and will multiply the avenues...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236876946
  • 9781236876942