The Crimes of Germany; Being an Illustrated Synopsis of the Violations of International Law and of Humanity by the Armed Forces of the German Empire

The Crimes of Germany; Being an Illustrated Synopsis of the Violations of International Law and of Humanity by the Armed Forces of the German Empire

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...their victims, after having taken from them their medals and such money as they possessed. I noticed that the quartermaster, whose name I do not know, had a little canvas bag attached to the right side of the belt of his trousers or drawers, which contained one 100-franc note and three 5-franc pieces. As regards the appearance of this soldier, I remember that he was of medium height and that his hair was brown, that is all I can tell you about him. "After the burial a German soldier told me that the medals and the money thus taken would be restored after the war to the families of these soldiers, whose names and regimental numbers had been duly noted." (Police Report.) "we Do Not Want Any Prisoners" Madame Wogt (Lea), born at Aubry, 22 years of age, worker in the factory known as "Les Tiges" at Saint-Die (Vosges), states: "On Saturday, 29th August, 1914, between 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning, at the time when an engagement was taking place in the neighborhood between the German and French troops, I had taken refuge with my father-in-law in the cellar of the house in which I reside. "Thirty soldiers of the 99th Regiment of Infantry came to take shelter in this cellar. They were discovered there by German soldiers. Seeing the Germans, the French soldiers laid down their arms and gave themselves up as prisoners. My father-in-law, who speaks German, conveyed to the Germans what the French soldiers were saying, but one of them replied in German, 'We do not want any prisoners.' They made the French soldiers come out of the cellar, and then compelled them to go down on their knees in the garden which adjoins the house; later they led them to the front of the house, and placed them up against it, a yard's...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524705
  • 9781236524706