Cranford
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Cranford

3.84 (29,450 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

From the author of North and South and Mary Barton, Elizabeth Gaskell's Cranford is a standalone publication of Elizabeth Gaskell's best-known work, with a critical introduction by Patricia Ingham in Penguin Classics.Cranford depicts the lives and preoccupations of the inhabitants of a small village - their petty snobberies, appetite for gossip, and loyal support for each other in times of need This is a community that runs on cooperation and gossip, at the very heart of which are the daughters of the former rector: Miss Deborah Jenkyns and her sister Miss Matty, But domestic peace is constantly threatened in the form of financial disaster, imagined burglaries, tragic accidents, and the reapparance of long-lost relatives. to Lady Glenmire, who shocks everyone by marrying the doctor. When men do appear, such as 'modern' Captain Brown or Matty's suitor from the past, they bring disruption and excitement to the everyday life of Cranford.In her introduction, Patricia Ingham places the novel in its literary and historical context, and discusses the theme of female friendship and Gaskell's narrative technique. This edition also contains an account of Gaskell's childhood in Knutsford, on which Cranford is based, appendices on fashion and domestic duties supplemented by illustrations, a chronology of Gaskell's life and works, suggestions for further reading, and explanatory notes.Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-65) was born in London, but grew up in the north of England in the village of Knutsford. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell and had four daughters, and one son who died in infancy. Her first novel, Mary Barton, was published in 1848, winning the attention of Charles Dickens, and most of her later work was published in his journals. She was also a lifelong friend of Charlotte Bronte, whose biography she wrote.If you enjoyed Cranford, you may like Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, also available in Penguin Classics.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 304 pages
  • 128 x 196 x 24mm | 222.26g
  • Penguin Books Ltd
  • PENGUIN CLASSICS
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • New edition
  • New
  • 0141439882
  • 9780141439884
  • 102,175

About Elizabeth Gaskell

Elizabeth Gaskell (1810 - 65) was born in London, but grew up in the north of England in the village of Knutsford. In 1832 she married the Rev. William Gaskell and had four daughters, and one son who died in infancy. Her first novel, Mary Barton, was published in 1848 and won the attention of Charles Dickens and most of her later work was publish in his journals. She was also a lifelong friend of Charlotte Bronte, whose biography she wrote, as well as her many novels and short stories.Patricia Ingham is Senior Research Fellow and Reader at St Anne's College, Oxford. She has written on the Victorian novel and on Hardy in particular. she is the General Editor of all Hardy's fiction in the Penguin Classics and has edited Gaskell's North and South for the series.
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Rating details

29,450 ratings
3.84 out of 5 stars
5 30% (8,810)
4 36% (10,605)
3 25% (7,454)
2 6% (1,899)
1 2% (682)

Our customer reviews

There's nothing like delving into the past to be absorbed by some way of life that seems so foreign and far removed from oneself, the present-day reader. Elizabeth Gaskell's 'Cranford' gives such an experience as she draws the reader into the 'small economies' and delightful idiosyncrasies of the townsfolk of Cranford. Gaskell's writing style is animated and lively; not cumbersome or dreary as one might think from a writer of her era. She takes you beyond the feeling of having 'stepped into the world' of Cranford to the more intimate stance of being present in the drawing rooms of her characters. The sturdy and stalwart Miss Jenkyns makes one want to stifle a laugh or hide a smile at her strictness ans straightness; the sweet and soft Miss Matty shines with human compassion and goodness; Miss Pole's efficient methods of communication are amusing to say the least. Indeed, the majority of Gaskell's main characters are women, but the men in the narrative are, too, full of wit and humour and liveliness. Thomas Holbrook and Captain Brown are some such men with merits and faults well drawn against the backdrop of Cranford society. Gaskell reveals enough of daily life of 19th century England to entice the curious to greater study. But she also infuses her narrative with struggles and passions that are common to all. The winning aspect is that she urges readers to think about these issues in a world so different to their own, and hence, appreciate those who forged lives amidst these struggles in a world devoid of technological, medical or industrial advances.show more
by Nova Martens
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