The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson; Selected from the Original Manuscripts, Bequeathed by Him to His Family, to Which Are Prefixed, a Biographical Account of That Author, and Observations on His Writings Volume 1

The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson; Selected from the Original Manuscripts, Bequeathed by Him to His Family, to Which Are Prefixed, a Biographical Account of That Author, and Observations on His Writings Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1804 edition. Excerpt: ...Richards0n's, probably, was owing to the want of an early familiarity with genteel life. The earliest correspondent upon this list-is AARON HILL, a man of somereal genius, a warm heart, and a generous disposition. He wrote several plays, was at one time manager of thetheatre, several poems, one in praise of Czar Peter, called the Northern Star, yet is-better known to most readers of the present day, by the lines Pope bestowed upon him in the Dunciad, than by his own works. Cohscious of originality of thought, ul'.-ich he really had, he affected to despise the public taste; and fondly prophesied, that posterity would-read his-works when Pope's were fallen into oblivion. He did ' ' not not so far trust to Posterity, however, as not to retaliate on his satirist in some finished lines, which may bear a comparison with Pope"s on Addison. Hill was a schemer, an unsuccessful one' all his life. During the greatest part of this correspondence, he lived retired at Plaistow, an aguish situation, from which the health of himself and his family seem to have suffered much. In this retirement he wrote several poems; the following lines, in which he speaks of himself, are very touching: Cover'd in Fortune's shade, I rest reclin'd, My griefs all silent, and my joys resign'd; Vith patient eye life's coming gloom survey, Nor shake th' outhasting sands, nor bid them stay; Yet, while from life my setting prospects fly, Fain-would my mind's weak offspring shun to die; Fain would their hope some light thro' time explore, The name's kind passport, when the man's no more. His style, in his letters, is turgid and cloudy, but every now and then illuminated VOL. 1. i with with a ray of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236978056
  • 9781236978059