Correspondence Relating to the Revision Proposed in the Village Revenue Establishments of the Madras Presidency Volume 1

Correspondence Relating to the Revision Proposed in the Village Revenue Establishments of the Madras Presidency Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$21.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...be given before a more reliable and regular constituted authority than the village headman, and this hardship would be less than the insecurity and trickery to which he would be exposed from the village officer. I fear, too, that in disputes arising out of the favoritism and misconduct of the village officers, matters would be so complicated before they come before the Tahsildar or Collector, that the difficulties in arriving at a correct judgment would be materially aggravated, and the number of appeals and complaints would occupy more time than the issue of orders on the applications submitted direct to the Tahsildar, especially in districts when the changes in a ryot's holding are few. (Signed) T. Clarke, No. 978. Order Thereon, 13th June 1860. 1. In this letter Mr. Pelly puts before Government, as connected with the settlement of the talook and village establishments, a question on which he is at issue with his colleagues, viz., whether village servants ought to be authorized to receive and act on applications for land, or to accept resignations of land. Mr. Pelly is in favor of this course, Messrs. Hall and Clarke are against it.-: 2. Mr, Pelly argues that to refuse the power to the village officers involves unnecessary trouble to the ryot; that in any case the application must be referred to the village officers for report; and that it would be better for the application to be made there direct, the matter settled at once, and a monthly report sent in due course to the Tahsildar who, by the entries in the accounts, would be enabled to check the correctness of such changes in his periodical tours. The argument of the untrustworthiness of village officials he considers to be counterbalanced by the almost certainty of detection in case of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123658550X
  • 9781236585509