The Correspondence of M. Tullius Cicero; Arranged According to Its Chronological Order with a Revision of the Text, a Commentary, and Introductory Essays on the Life of Cicero and the Style of His Letters Volume 4

The Correspondence of M. Tullius Cicero; Arranged According to Its Chronological Order with a Revision of the Text, a Commentary, and Introductory Essays on the Life of Cicero and the Style of His Letters Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...memoriam nominis mei: sin autem nulla erit, nihil accidet ei separatim a reliquis civibus. Nam quod rogas ut respioiam generum meum, adolescentem optimum mibique carissimum, an dubitas, cum scias, quanti cum ilium turn vero Tulliam meam faciam, quin ea me oura vehementissime sollicitet? et eo magis, quod in communibus miseriis hao tamen oblectabar specula, Dolabellam meum vel potius nostrum fore ab iis molestiis, quas liberalitate sua contraxerat, liberum. Velim quaeras, quos ille dies sustinuerit, in urbe dum fuit, quam acerbos sibi, quam mihimet ipsi socero non honestos. 6. Itaque neque ego hunc Hispaniensem casum exspecto, de quo mihi exploratum est ita esse, ut tu scribis, neque quidquam astute cogito. Si quando erit civitas, erit profecto nobis locus: sin autem non erit, in easdem soli Hoc This is neuter, as referring to Fam. x. 28, 3, magnum damnum factum the whole clause quod nunquam hello civili est in Servio. But see Adn. Crit., and cp. interfuisset. For the double dative, illi Schmalz, Antib. i. 583. For the senti and ignaviae, cp. Nepos Timol. 4, 2, neque ment cp. Off. i. 121, Jin. hoc ei quisqunm tribuebat superbiae; also an dubitas' 'can it be that you are in Roby, 1163, who quotes Ter. Andr. ii. doubt, ' implying that Cicero thinks that 1, 31 (331); Liv. iii. 11, 6. he is in doubt. Wesenberg wishes to 4. perturbatione 'convulsion.' read num (Em. Alt. 4), which might redemissem 'which I would gladly have been corrupted, and would make good have averted from the State at the cost of sense, but is not absolutely necessary, annoyances to myself and my family, even specula 'gleam of hojie.' at the cost of those very dangers against dies These were the settling days on which you aoVise me to be on my guard.' which Dolabella had been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 238 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 431g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236489462
  • 9781236489463