The Correspondence of John Ray; Consisting of Selections from the Philosophical Letters Published by Dr Derham, and Original Letters of John Ray, in the Collection of the British Museum. Edited by Edw. Lankester. (with John Ray's Portait)

The Correspondence of John Ray; Consisting of Selections from the Philosophical Letters Published by Dr Derham, and Original Letters of John Ray, in the Collection of the British Museum. Edited by Edw. Lankester. (with John Ray's Portait)

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...there are some thousands of them in these two valleys of Lhanberys and Nant-Phrancon, whereof (for what I can learn) there are but two or three that have fallen in the memory of any man now living, in the ordinary course of nature we shall be compelled to allow the rest many thousands of years more than the age of the world. But I have been too tedious in things that are no information to you, for which I must beg your pardon, though I cannot forbear to add two other particulars which seemed very singular. First, at the highest parts of the Glyder, (a mountain about the height of Cader Idris), there are prodigious heaps of stones, many of them of the largeness of those of Stonehenge, but of all the irregular shapes imaginable, and they all lie in as much confusion as the ruins of a building can be supposed to do. Now I must confess I cannot well imagine how this has happened; for that ever they should be indeed the ruins of some edifice, I can by no means allow, in regard that most of them are as irregular as those stones are that have fallen to the valleys; we must, then, allow them to be the skeleton of the hill exposed to open view by rains, snow, &c.; but then how came they to lie across each other in this confusion? some of them being of an oblong flat form, having their two ends e. g. E. and w., others laid athwart these, some of them laid flat, but many of them inclining, being supported by other stones at the one end, &c. I must confess I have seen nothing that appeared to me so strange as this in all those mountains. Had they been in a valley I had presently concluded they had fallen from the neighbouring rocks, but being on the very summit of the hill, they seem to me unaccountable. I know it might serve to confirm Dr. Burnet's...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236546261
  • 9781236546265