Correspondence Between John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, and Several Citizens of Massachusetts Concerning the Charge of a Design to Dissolve the Union Alleged to Have Existed in That State; To Which Are Now Added

Correspondence Between John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, and Several Citizens of Massachusetts Concerning the Charge of a Design to Dissolve the Union Alleged to Have Existed in That State; To Which Are Now Added

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...of the letter were altogether idle, but the effect supposed by Mr Adams to be contemplated by the writer, cou d be produced only by giving them publicity. It was communicated to Mr Adams without any injunction of scorecy. He has no doubt it was shewn to others. Its object was, he supposes, to_.accredit acalumny, that Mr Jefferson, and his measures, were subservient to France. That the British government were in formed of a plan determined upon, by France, to effect a conquest of the British Provinces on this continent, and a revolution in the government of the United States, as means to which, they were first to produce a war between the United States and England. ' A letter of this tenor was no doubt shewn to.Mr Adams, as we must believe upon his word. The discovery would not be surprising, that British, as well as French oflicers and citizens, in a time.of eace with this country, availed themselves of many channels or conveying their speculations and stratagems to other innocent ears as well' as those of Mr Adams, with a view to influence public.opinion. But the subject matter of the letter was an absurdit. Who did not know that, in 1807, after the battle of Trafiilgar, the crippled navy of France could not undertake to transport even a single regiment across the British channel? And if the object was the conquest of the British provinces by the United States alone, how could a revolution m their government, which must divide and weaken, it, promote that end? The folly 'of a British governor in attempting to give. ourrenc to a story which savours so stronglv of the burlesque, can e equalle only by the credulity of Mr Adams, in believing it calculated to produce effect; and if.'he did so believe, it furnishes a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236858212
  • 9781236858214