Correspondence Between Great Britain and the United States Respecting the Question of Territorial Jurisdiction and Boundary Between the Province of Ne

Correspondence Between Great Britain and the United States Respecting the Question of Territorial Jurisdiction and Boundary Between the Province of Ne

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...of New Brunswick to all parts of the settled Territory, comprehended in the Claim of Great Britain, seems to give rise to such an inquiry. The summonses served on the Settlers on the Aroostook and upon the St. John, from the Maiiumticook to the Fish River and St. Francis, appear, by comparison of numerous Copies, to be all in the same form, for trespass and intrusion on Crown Lands. A Copy of an information served on John Baker, since his imprisonment, describes the Land of which he is in occupation, as lying within the parish of Kent, in the County of York. It may be therefore pertinent to inquire into the history of the Parish of Kent, and refer to other measures of the Provincial Government, preliminary to the above-mentioned process. The Act of incorporation of the Parish of Kent, is dated 1821. It is entitled "An Act to erect the upper part of the County of York into a Town or Parish," and provides, that " all that part of the County of York, lying above the Parish of Wakefield, on both sides of the River St. John, be erected into a Town or Parish, by the name of Kent." The Parish of Wakefield was incorporated in 1803, by an Act also entitled " An Act for erecting the upper part of the County of York into a distinct Town or Parish." A statistical account of New Brunswick, published in Fredericktou, in 1825, describes the Parish of Kent as extending on both sides of the River, from the Grand Falls to Wakefield. The Parish of Wakefield, it is understood, extended above the Military Post at Presque Isle, a Station which was abandoned the Year following the creation of the Parish of Kent. A succinct statement may be made of the measures adopted by the Government of New Brunswick the present season. By an official Act of the 9th of March last, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236675738
  • 9781236675736