The Controversy Over Neutral Rights Between the United States and France, 1797-1800; A Collection of American State Papers and Judicial Decisions

The Controversy Over Neutral Rights Between the United States and France, 1797-1800; A Collection of American State Papers and Judicial Decisions

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... very inimical to France; the President said he would never send another minister without assurances that he would be received, respected, and honored as "the representative of a great, free, powerful, and independent nation" (Foreign Relations, vol. 2, p. 199); but before this (June 21, 1798), Congress had passed the act "to more effectually protect the commerce and coasts of the United States" (May 28, 1798, 1 Stat. L. 561), the act suspending commercial relations with France (June 13, 1798), and various other laws of similar import, which will be considered hereafter in connection with another branch of this case. Washington was put in command of the army as lieutenant-general and commander-in-chief, and in accepting said (5 Annals of Cong., 622): The conduct of the Directory of France towards our country; their insidious hostility to its Government; their various practices to withdraw the affections of the people from it; the evident tendency of their acts and those of their agents to countenance and invigorate opposition; their disregard of solemn treaties and the law of nations; their war upon our defenseless commerce; their treatment of our ministers of peace; and their demands, amounting to tribute, could not fail to excite in me corresponding sentiments with those my countrymen have so generally expressed. This state of affairs could not long continue. Talleyrand, appreciating the dangers of the situation, soon opened indirect communication with the United States, and on the 28th September, said that our plenipotentiary if sent would be "received with the respect due to the representative of a free, independent, and powerful nation." (Foreign Relations, vol. 2, p. 242.) This was an exact compliance with the President's condition...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 204 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236672593
  • 9781236672599