The Constitution of Jersey, Shewing Its Incorporation with the Kingdom of England, by Henry 1st., the Legislative Powers of Parliament, and the Nature of the Authority of the Queen in Council, Over the Said Island

The Constitution of Jersey, Shewing Its Incorporation with the Kingdom of England, by Henry 1st., the Legislative Powers of Parliament, and the Nature of the Authority of the Queen in Council, Over the Said Island

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...now be enacted in the island by any other body than the whole of the States, Ibid but they may be enacted by the Queen in Council. Order, March 9, 1854 The States have no legislative authority whatever, according to the strict meaning of those words, although it cannot be denied that they have often times exercised it, notwithstanding the many Orders in Council that prohibit them from so doing. Their jurisdiction is merely of a police nature, affecting common things, and not fundamental. It 1s to be exercised provisionally, or in other words, until the Queen in Council can be consulted, and if Her Majesty does not approve their ordinance before the expiration of three ears from the date of its enactment, it is understood, that she disallows it, and the States have not the power in law, to re-ena/ct it, but they frequently do it, putting the law at defiance, and defrauding the crown of its prerogative! Neither have the States the power to abrogate any old, or create any new law, with the Governor's consent; because their ordinances have no power or property of law in them until they are confirmed. Order, July 2, 1619 Nor have the States the power to deliberate on the propriety of doing it, with the view of ultimately obtaining the anction of the Crown, witlwut special leavefi/rat had and obtained, but they may make temporary ordinances to enforce the observance of existing laws, with the G-overnor's sanction, but not permanently without the royal confirmation. "The States are generally assembled for raising money to supply public occasions, to make addresses to or to send deputies to the King and Council, and to regulate matters concerning the court and political government of the isle." Answer of the States to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236833147
  • 9781236833143