Considerations on the Great Western Canal, from the Hudson to Lake Erie; With a View of Its Expence, Advantages, and Progress

Considerations on the Great Western Canal, from the Hudson to Lake Erie; With a View of Its Expence, Advantages, and Progress

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...that the national government would see the poliey of taking up this great Canal, as a national work. That matter is now at rest, New-York has reason to be proud and rejoiee, that she of herself has eommeneed the undertaking, and is able to finish it. She knows her strength, and she knows also how to apply it. If on the eonstitutional question, involving the appropriation of money t?ythe national government, to open Roads and Canals, she has felt a zeal and warmth; it has not been for herself alone but for other states, less rieh in population and wealth. If her statesmen have felt with the Clays and Baldwins of the west, and the Lowndeses, the Tuekers and the Calhouns oT the south 4 they have felt for the grandeur of the nation, not for the treasury of their own state, whieh is amply eompetent to every exigeney of our poliey, however bold and munifieent. Every doubt in relation to the Expense of making the Western Canal is now removed, and removed forever, if indeed any heretofore really existed. The distanee over whieh the Canal is to pass, and the impediments supposed to he eonneeted with it, next deserve consideration. In undertaking to open three or four hundred miles of Canal, mueh previous preparation was neeessary. The New-York Legislature made the first, appropriation for this o'hjeet, on the 15th April, 1817. The first eontraet was dated on the 27th June, 1817, although no labor was done until the following ith of July. Even after the eontraets.pTMsr- D of the Ca were mode, as the eontraetors found their own implements naiiastseand tools, some time was requisite for proper arrangements. Owing therefore to the lateness of the season, and the great rains whieh inundated the eountry, embraeing that part of die Canal route for which the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123651369X
  • 9781236513694