Conservatism, Consumer Choice, and the Food and Drug Administration During the Reagan Era

Conservatism, Consumer Choice, and the Food and Drug Administration During the Reagan Era : A Prescription for Scandal

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Description

Using a balanced methodological approach, Conservatism, Consumer Choice, and the Food and Drug Administration during the Reagan Era explores American pharmaceutical regulation and connects political, cultural, and business history to capture the relationship between Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulators, pharmaceutical companies, and interest groups. Rooted in both qualitative and quantitative sources, Richert's book goes inside the FDA to reveal an intriguing story of the drug business, bureaucrats, conservatism, and the American presidency.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 260 pages
  • 152 x 228 x 16mm | 349g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 6 black & white halftones
  • 073919464X
  • 9780739194645

About Lucas Richert

Lucas Richert is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Saskatchewan.show more

Review quote

Lucas Richert's book ably reviews the place of the FDA in the modern regulatory order, and helps make the agency's struggles comprehensible. Richert shows that our system of drug approval and regulation cannot be understood in simple back-and-white terms. Instead, a host of competing interests pull the FDA in all sorts of directions. Anyone interested in contemporary drug regulation will find this a useful resource. -- Joseph F. Spillane, University of Florida Conservatives, Consumer Choice, and the FDA in the Reagan Era is an engaging analysis of the influence of presidential ideology, congressional oversight, and the political character of the FDA's leadership on the agency's institutional identity and regulatory work. Lucas Richert's compelling and nuanced perspective exposes the limits of the deregulatory ethos of the Reagan era and demonstrates the persistence of an institutional identity that has balanced the imperatives of consumer safety against those of pharmaceutical innovation. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the recent history of pharmaceutical regulation and for policymakers engaged in the making of pharmaceutical policy. -- Dominique Tobbell, University of Minnesota A thoughtful and accessible narrative history that situates the FDA in the partisan and ideological politics of the long Reagan era. -- David Herzberg, University at Buffalo, State University of New York The effect of presidential and interest-group politics on public agencies has been a fundamental problem in public administration for more than a century. This new book, a case study of the Food and Drug Administration during the 1980s, is an effort to show how President Ronald Reagan's budget and regulatory policies impacted the FDA's effectiveness in protecting the public and in supporting the creation of new pharmaceuticals. This period was also the time of the beginning of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the rapid growth of generic drugs. Richert suggests that many of the FDA's difficulties in the 1980s and beyond can be traced to the Reagan administration's budget cutting, Congress's expansion of the agency's range of responsibilities, and political pressures from HIV/AIDS advocates and makers of generic drugs. He based his analysis on a wide range of secondary sources, along with official documents from the FDA and elected officials. Readers will reach different conclusions regarding the book's success in establishing the causal connections between Reaganism and the FDA's problems, but the book makes a strong case that the FDA does not operate in a political vacuum. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduate collections and above. CHOICE This book is a contribution to a growing body of scholarship on the history of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...The book tells an interesting part of the FDA story in the 1980s that can be put into longer historical perspective. Social History Of Medicineshow more

Table of contents

CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS INTRODUCTION THE FDA IN THE POLITICAL AND REGULATORY ORDER, 1906-PRESENT (1) DISENCHANTMENT AND DRUG REGULATION DURING THE SEVENTIES (2) CARTER AND THE FDA (3) OPENING MOVES: REAGAN AND THE FDA, 1980-82 (4) THE CONTINUING EVOLUTION OF THE FDA, 1983-1984 (5) REAGAN'S LEADERSHIP, HEALTH ACTIVISM, AND THE HIV/AIDS CRISIS (6) THE TRIUMPH OF CONSERVATISM: SCANDAL AND BEYOND (7) CONCLUSION (8) NOTES BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDICESshow more