Conquest of Siberia; By the Chevalier Dillon, and the History of the Transactions, Wars, Commerce, & C ... Between Russia and China, from the Earliest Period

Conquest of Siberia; By the Chevalier Dillon, and the History of the Transactions, Wars, Commerce, & C ... Between Russia and China, from the Earliest Period

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...concerned, is reported to have said, _ on this subject, that the four tribes of Hindus, the Brahmen, Cshatriya, Vaisya, and Sudra, would, like pzin (beetle-leaf), chunzim (lime), suprirz (beetle-nut), and khat (terra japonica, or catechu), become all of one colour, when well chewed. astonishment in the minds of the Muhammedan con-;' querors of India, who saw the religious prejudices of the Hindus, which they had calculated upon as one of the pillars of their safety, because they limited the great majority of the population to peaceable occupations, fall before the touch of a bold and enthusiastic innovator, who opened at once, to men of the lowest tribe, the dazzling prospect of earthly glory. All who subscribed to his tenets were upon a level, and the Brahmen who entered his sect had no higher claims to eminence than the lowest Sudra who swept his house. It was the object of Gevind to make all Sikhs equal, 'l" and that their advancement should solely depend upon their exertions: and well aware how necessary it was to inspire men of a low race, and of groveling minds, with pride in themselves, he changed the name of his followers from Sikh to Singh, or lion; thus giving to all his followers that honourable title which had been before exclusively assumed by the Rajaputs, the first military class of Hindus: and every Sikh felt himself at once elevated to rank with the highest, by this proud appellation. The disciples of Gevind were required to devote themselves to arms, always to have steel about them in some shape or other; to wear a blue dress; to allow their hair to grow; to exclaim, when they met Some men of the lowest Hindu tribe, of the occupation of sweepers, were employed to bring away the corpse of Tegh...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236738292
  • 9781236738295