Connecting Networks Companion Guide
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Connecting Networks Companion Guide

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Connecting Networks Companion Guide is the official supplemental textbook for the Connecting Networks course in the Cisco (R) Networking Academy (R) CCNA (R) Routing and Switching curriculum. This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course allows you to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. You will learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. You will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. The Companion Guide is designed as a portable desk reference to use anytime, anywhere to reinforce the material from the course and organize your time. The book's features help you focus on important concepts to succeed in this course: Chapter objectives-Review core concepts by answering the focus questions listed at the beginning of each chapter. Key terms-Refer to the lists of networking vocabulary introduced and highlighted in context in each chapter. Glossary-Consult the comprehensive Glossary with 195 terms. Summary of Activities and Labs-Maximize your study time with this complete list of all associated practice exercises at the end of each chapter. Check Your Understanding-Evaluate your readiness with the end-of-chapter questions that match the style of questions you see in the online course quizzes. The answer key explains each answer. How To-Look for this icon to study the steps you need to learn to perform certain tasks. Interactive Activities-Reinforce your understanding of topics with all the different exercises from the online course identified throughout the book with this icon. Videos-Watch the videos embedded within the online course. Packet Tracer Activities-Explore and visualize networking concepts using Packet Tracer exercises interspersed throughout the chapters. Hands-on Labs-Work through all the course labs and Class Activities that are included in the course and published in the separate Lab Manual.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 576 pages
  • 204 x 234 x 30mm | 1,219.98g
  • Pearson Education (US)
  • Cisco Press
  • Indianapolis, United States
  • English
  • 1587133326
  • 9781587133329
  • 593,063

About Cisco Networking Academy

Rick Graziani teaches computer science and computer networking courses at Cabrillo College in Aptos, California. Prior to teaching, Rick worked in the informationtechnology field for Santa Cruz Operation, Tandem Computers, and Lockheed Missiles and Space Corporation. He holds an M.A. in Computer Science and Systems Theory from California State University Monterey Bay. Rick is also a member of the Curriculum Development team for the Cisco Networking Academy since 1999. Rick has authored multiple books for Cisco Press and multiple online courses for the Cisco Networking Academy. Rick is the author of the Cisco Press book IPv6 Fundamentals and has presented on IPv6 at several Cisco Academy conferences. He is the coauthor of the Cisco Press book Routing Protocols Companion Guide. When Rick is not working, he is most likely surfing at one of his favorite Santa Cruz surf breaks. Bob Vachon is a professor in the Computer Systems Technology program at Cambrian College in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, where he teaches networking infrastructure courses. He has over 30 years of work and teaching experience in the computer networking and information technology field. Since 2001, Bob has collaborated as team lead, lead author, and subject matter expert on various CCNA, CCNA-S, and CCNP projects for Cisco and the Cisco Networking Academy. He also authored the CCNA Accessing the WAN Companion Guide and the CCNA Security (640-554) Portable Command Guide. He is the coauthor of the Cisco Press book Routing Protocols Companion Guide. In his downtime, Bob enjoys playing the guitar, shooting darts or pool, and either working in his gardens or white-water canoe tripping.show more

Table of contents

Introduction xix Chapter 1: Hierarchical Network Designs 1 Objectives 1 Key Terms 1 Introduction (1.0.1.1) 2 Hierarchical Network Design Overview (1.1) 2 Enterprise Network Campus Design (1.1.1) 2 Network Requirements (1.1.1.1) 3 Structured Engineering Principles (1.1.1.2) 4 Hierarchical Network Design (1.1.2) 4 Network Hierarchy (1.1.2.1) 4 The Access Layer (1.1.2.2) 6 The Distribution Layer (1.1.2.3) 7 The Core Layer (1.1.2.4) 9 Two-Tier Collapsed Core Design (1.1.2.5) 10 Cisco Enterprise Architecture (1.2) 10 Modular Design (1.2.1.1) 11 Modules in the Enterprise Architecture (1.2.1.2) 12 Cisco Enterprise Architecture Model (1.2.2) 14 Cisco Enterprise Architecture Model (1.2.2.1) 14 Cisco Enterprise Campus (1.2.2.2) 15 Cisco Enterprise Edge (1.2.2.3) 17 Service Provider Edge (1.2.2.4) 18 Remote Functional Area (1.2.2.5) 21 Enterprise Branch 21 Enterprise Teleworker 22 Enterprise Data Center 22 Evolving Network Architectures (1.3) 22 IT Challenges (1.3.1.1) 22 Emerging Enterprise Architectures (1.3.1.2) 23 Emerging Network Architectures (1.3.2) 24 Cisco Borderless Networks (1.3.2.1) 24 Collaboration Architecture (1.3.2.2) 25 Data Center and Virtualization (1.3.2.3) 26 Expanding the Network (1.3.2.4) 27 Summary (1.4) 29 Practice 30 Class Activities 30 Packet Tracer Activities 30 Check Your Understanding Questions 31 Chapter 2: Connecting the WAN 35 Objectives 35 Key Terms 35 Introduction (2.0.1.1) 37 WAN Technologies Overview (2.1) 37 Why a WAN? (2.1.1.1) 37 Are WANs Necessary? (2.1.1.2) 38 Evolving Networks (2.1.1.3) 39 Small Office (2.1.1.4) 39 Campus Network (2.1.1.5) 40 Branch Networks (2.1.1.6) 42 Distributed Network (2.1.1.7) 43 WAN Operations (2.1.2) 44 WANs in the OSI Model (2.1.2.1) 44 Common WAN Terminology (2.1.2.2) 45 WAN Devices (2.1.2.3) 47 Circuit-Switched Networks (2.1.2.4) 48 Packet-Switched Networks (2.1.2.5) 50 Selecting a WAN Technology (2.2) 51 WAN Link Connection Options (2.2.1.1) 51 Service Provider Network Infrastructure (2.2.1.2) 52 Private WAN Infrastructures (2.2.2) 54 Leased Lines (2.2.2.1) 54 Dialup (2.2.2.2) 55 ISDN (2.2.2.3) 56 Frame Relay (2.2.2.4) 58 ATM (2.2.2.5) 59 Ethernet WAN (2.2.2.6) 60 MPLS (2.2.2.7) 62 VSAT (2.2.2.8) 63 Public WAN Infrastructure (2.2.3) 64 DSL (2.2.3.1) 64 Cable (2.2.3.2) 65 Wireless (2.2.3.3) 66 3G/4G Cellular (2.2.3.4) 67 VPN Technology (2.2.3.5) 68 Selecting WAN Services (2.2.4) 70 Choosing a WAN Link Connection (2.2.4.1, 2.2.4.2) 70 What Is the Purpose of the WAN? 70 What Is the Geographic Scope? 70 What Are the Traffic Requirements? 71 Summary (2.3) 73 Practice 74 Class Activities 74 Labs 74 Check Your Understanding Questions 74 Chapter 3: Point-to-Point Connections 79 Objectives 79 Key Terms 79 Introduction (3.0.1.1) 80 Serial Point-to-Point Overview (3.1) 80 Serial Communications (3.1.1) 81 Serial and Parallel Ports (3.1.1.1) 81 Serial Communication (3.1.1.2) 82 Point-to-Point Communication Links (3.1.1.3) 84 Time-Division Multiplexing (3.1.1.4) 85 Statistical Time-Division Multiplexing (3.1.1.5) 86 TDM Examples - Sonet and SDM (3.1.1.6) 87 Demarcation Point (3.1.1.7) 88 DTE-DCE (3.1.1.8) 90 Serial Cables (3.1.1.9) 91 Serial Bandwidth (3.1.1.10) 94 HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2) 96 WAN Encapsulation Protocols (3.1.2.1) 96 HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2.2) 97 HDLC Frame Types (3.1.2.3) 98 Configuring HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2.4) 100 Troubleshooting a Serial Interface (3.1.2.5) 100 PPP Operation (3.2) 104 Benefits of PPP (3.2.1) 104 Introducing PPP (3.2.1.1) 104 Advantages of PPP (3.2.1.2) 106 LCP and NCP (3.2.2) 106 PPP Layered Architecture (3.2.2.1) 106 PPP - Link Control Protocol (LCP) (3.2.2.2) 107 PPP - Network Control Protocol (NCP) (3.2.2.3) 108 PPP Frame Structure (3.2.2.4) 108 PPP Sessions (3.2.3) 109 Establishing a PPP Session (3.2.3.1) 110 LCP Operation (3.2.3.2) 111 LCP Packet (3.2.3.3) 113 PPP Configuration Options (3.2.3.4) 115 NCP Explained (3.2.3.5) 117 Configure PPP (3.3) 118 Configure PPP (3.3.1) 118 PPP Configuration Options (3.3.1.1) 119 PPP Basic Configuration Command (3.3.1.2) 120 PPP Compression Commands (3.3.1.3) 121 PPP Link Quality Monitoring Command (3.3.1.4) 122 PPP Multilink Commands (3.3.1.5) 123 Verifying PPP Configuration (3.3.1.6) 125 PPP Authentication (3.3.2) 126 PPP Authentication Protocols (3.3.2.1) 127 Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) (3.3.2.2) 127 Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) (3.3.2.3) 129 PPP Encapsulation and Authentication Process (3.3.2.4) 131 Configuring PPP Authentication (3.3.2.5) 134 Configuring PPP with Authentication (3.3.2.6) 136 Troubleshoot WAN Connectivity (3.4) 138 Troubleshoot PPP (3.4.1) 138 Troubleshooting PPP Serial Encapsulation (3.4.1.1) 138 Debug PPP (3.4.1.2) 140 Troubleshooting a PPP Configuration with Authentication (3.4.1.3) 142 Summary (3.5) 145 Practice 146 Class Activities 146 Labs 146 Packet Tracer Activities 146 Check Your Understanding Questions 147 Chapter 4: Frame Relay 153 Objectives 153 Key Terms 153 Introduction (4.0.1.1) 154 Introduction to Frame Relay (4.1) 154 Benefits of Frame Relay (4.1.1) 155 Introducing Frame Relay (4.1.1.1) 155 Benefits of Frame Relay WAN Technology (4.1.1.2) 156 Dedicated Line Requirements (4.1.1.3) 157 Cost-Effectiveness and Flexibility of Frame Relay (4.1.1.4) 159 Frame Relay Operation (4.1.2) 160 Virtual Circuits (4.1.2.1) 160 Multiple Virtual Circuits (4.1.2.2) 163 Frame Relay Encapsulation (4.1.2.3) 165 Frame Relay Topologies (4.1.2.4, 4.1.2.5) 167 Frame Relay Address Mapping (4.1.2.6) 171 Local Management Interface (LMI) (4.1.2.7) 174 LMI Extensions (4.1.2.8) 175 Using LMI and Inverse ARP to Map Addresses (4.1.2.9) 178 Advanced Frame Relay Concepts (4.1.3) 180 Access Rate and Committed Information Rate (4.1.3.1) 180 Frame Relay Example (4.1.3.2) 181 Bursting (4.1.3.3) 183 Frame Relay Flow Control (4.1.3.4) 184 Configure Frame Relay (4.2) 187 Configure Basic Frame Relay (4.2.1) 187 Basic Frame Relay Configuration Commands (4.2.1.1) 187 Configuring a Static Frame Relay Map (4.2.1.2) 190 Verify a Static Frame Relay Map (4.2.1.3) 192 Configure Subinterfaces (4.2.2) 193 Reachability Issues (4.2.2.1) 193 Solving Reachability Issues (4.2.2.2) 196 Configuring Point-to-Point Subinterfaces (4.2.2.3) 199 Example: Configuring Point-to-Point Subinterfaces (4.2.2.4) 200 Troubleshoot Connectivity (4.3) 203 Troubleshoot Frame Relay (4.3.1) 203 Verifying Frame Relay Operation: Frame Relay Interface (4.3.1.1) 203 Verifying Frame Relay Operation: LMI Operations (4.3.1.2) 204 Verifying Frame Relay Operation: PVC Status (4.3.1.3) 205 Verifying Frame Relay Operation: Inverse ARP (4.3.1.4) 205 Troubleshooting Frame Relay Operation (4.3.1.5) 207 Summary (4.4) 209 Practice 210 Class Activities 210 Labs 210 Packet Tracer Activities 210 Check Your Understanding Questions 211 Chapter 5: Network Address Translation for IPv4 217 Objectives 217 Key Terms 217 Introduction (5.0.1.1) 218 NAT Operation (5.1) 219 NAT Characteristics (5.1.1) 219 IPv4 Private Address Space (5.1.1.1) 219 What Is NAT? (5.1.1.2) 220 NAT Terminology (5.1.1.3) 221 How NAT Works (5.1.1.5) 224 Types of NAT (5.1.2) 225 Static NAT (5.1.2.1) 225 Dynamic NAT (5.1.2.2) 226 Port Address Translation (PAT) (5.1.2.3) 227 Next Available Port (5.1.2.4) 228 Comparing NAT and PAT (5.1.2.5) 230 Benefits of NAT (5.1.3) 231 Benefits of NAT (5.1.3.1) 231 Disadvantages of NAT (5.1.3.2) 232 Configuring NAT (5.2) 233 Configuring Static NAT (5.2.1) 233 Configuring Static NAT (5.2.1.1) 233 Analyzing Static NAT (5.2.1.2) 235 Verifying Static NAT (5.2.1.3) 237 Configuring Dynamic NAT (5.2.2) 238 Dynamic NAT Operation (5.2.2.1) 238 Configuring Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.2) 239 Analyzing Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.3) 242 Verifying Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.4) 244 Configuring Port Address Translation (PAT) (5.2.3) 247 Configuring PAT: Address Pool (5.2.3.1) 247 Configuring PAT: Single Address (5.2.3.2) 249 Analyzing PAT (5.2.3.3) 251 Verifying PAT (5.2.3.4) 253 Port Forwarding (5.2.4) 255 Port Forwarding (5.2.4.1) 255 SOHO Example (5.2.4.2) 257 Configuring Port Forwarding with IOS (5.2.4.3) 258 Configuring NAT and IPv6 (5.2.5) 260 NAT for IPv6? (5.2.5.1) 260 IPv6 Unique Local Addresses (5.2.5.2) 262 NAT for IPv6 (5.2.5.3) 263 Troubleshooting NAT (5.3) 264 Troubleshooting NAT: show Commands (5.3.1.1) 264 Troubleshooting NAT: debug Command (5.3.1.2) 266 Case Study (5.3.1.3) 268 Summary (5.4) 271 Practice 272 Class Activities 272 Labs 272 Packet Tracer Activities 272 Check Your Understanding Questions 273 Chapter 6: Broadband Solutions 279 Objectives 279 Key Terms 279 Introduction (6.0.1.1) 280 Teleworking (6.1) 280 Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1) 280 Introducing Teleworking (6.1.1.1) 281 Employer Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1.2) 281 Community and Government Benefits (6.1.1.3) 282 Individual Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1.4) 283 Detriments to Telework (6.1.1.5) 283 Business Requirements for Teleworker Services (6.1.2) 284 Teleworker Solution (6.1.2.1) 284 Teleworker Connectivity Requirements (6.1.2.2) 286 Comparing Broadband Solutions (6.2) 287 Cable (6.2.1) 287 What is a Cable System? (6.2.1.1) 287 Cable and the Electromagnetic Spectrum (6.2.1.2) 289 DOCSIS (6.2.1.3) 290 Cable Components (6.2.1.4) 291 DSL (6.2.2) 293 What is DSL? (6.2.2.1) 293 DSL Connections (6.2.2.2) 294 Separating Voice and Data in ADSL (6.2.2.3) 295 Broadband Wireless (6.2.3) 298 Types of Broadband Wireless Technologies (6.2.3.1, 6.2.3.2) 298 Selecting Broadband Solutions (6.2.4) 303 Comparing Broadband Solutions (6.2.4.1) 303 Configuring xDSL Connectivity (6.3) 304 PPPoE Overview (6.3.1) 304 PPPoE Motivation (6.3.1.1) 304 PPPoE Concepts (6.3.1.2) 306 Configuring PPPoE (6.3.2) 306 PPPoE Configuration (6.3.2.1) 307 Summary (6.4) 309 Practice 310 Class Activities 310 Labs 310 Check Your Understanding Questions 310 Chapter 7: Securing Site-to-Site Connectivity 313 Objectives 313 Key Terms 313 Introduction (7.0.1.1) 314 VPNs (7.1) 314 Fundamentals of VPNs (7.1.1) 314 Introducing VPNs (7.1.1.1) 315 Benefits of VPNs (7.1.1.2) 316 Types of VPNs (7.1.2) 317 Remote-Access VPNs (7.1.2.2) 318 Site-to-Site GRE Tunnels (7.2) 319 Fundamentals of Generic Routing Encapsulation (7.2.1) 319 Introduction to GRE (7.2.1.1) 319 Characteristics of GRE (7.2.1.2) 320 Configuring GRE Tunnels (7.2.2) 321 GRE Tunnel Configuration (7.2.2.1) 322 GRE Tunnel Verification (7.2.2.2) 324 Introducing IPsec (7.3) 326 Internet Protocol Security (7.3.1) 326 IPsec (7.3.1.1) 326 IPsec Security Services (7.3.1.2) 327 IPsec Framework (7.3.2) 328 Confidentiality with Encryption (7.3.2.1) 328 Encryption Algorithms (7.3.2.2) 330 Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (7.3.2.3) 332 Integrity with Hash Algorithms (7.3.2.4) 332 IPsec Authentication (7.3.2.5) 334 IPsec Protocol Framework (7.3.2.6) 335 Remote Access (7.4) 337 Remote-Access VPN Solutions (7.4.1) 337 Types of Remote-Access VPNs (7.4.1.1) 337 Cisco SSL VPN (7.4.1.2) 338 Cisco SSL VPN Solutions (7.4.1.3) 340 IPsec Remote-Access VPNs (7.4.2) 341 IPsec Remote Access (7.4.2.1) 341 Cisco Easy VPN Server and Remote (7.4.2.2) 342 Cisco Easy VPN Client (7.4.2.3) 343 Comparing IPsec and SSL (7.4.2.4) 345 Summary (7.5) 347 Practice 348 Class Activities 348 Labs 348 Packet Tracer Activities 348 Check Your Understanding Questions 348 Chapter 8: Monitoring the Network 351 Objectives 351 Key Terms 351 Introduction (8.0.1.1) 352 Syslog (8.1) 352 Syslog Operation (8.1.1) 352 Introduction to Syslog (8.1.1.1) 352 Syslog Operation (8.1.1.2) 354 Syslog Message Format (8.1.1.3) 355 Service Timestamp (8.1.1.4) 357 Configuring Syslog (8.1.2) 358 Syslog Server (8.1.2.1) 358 Default Logging (8.1.2.2) 359 Router and Switch Commands for Syslog Clients (8.1.2.3) 360 Verifying Syslog (8.1.2.4) 362 SNMP (8.2) 364 SNMP Operation (8.2.1) 364 Introduction to SNMP (8.2.1.1) 364 SNMP Operation (8.2.1.2) 365 SNMP Agent Traps (8.2.1.3) 366 SNMP Versions (8.2.1.4) 368 Community Strings (8.2.1.5) 370 Management Information Base Object ID (8.2.1.6) 371 Configuring SNMP (8.2.2) 374 Steps for Configuring SNMP (8.2.2.1) 374 Verifying SNMP Configuration (8.2.2.2) 375 Security Best Practices (8.2.2.3) 378 NetFlow (8.3) 380 NetFlow Operation (8.3.1) 380 Introducing NetFlow (8.3.1.1) 380 Understanding NetFlow (8.3.1.2) 381 Network Flows (8.3.1.3) 383 Configuring NetFlow (8.3.2) 384 Verifying NetFlow (8.3.2.2) 386 Examining Traffic Patterns (8.3.3) 390 Identifying NetFlow Collector Functions (8.3.3.1) 390 NetFlow Analysis with a NetFlow Collector (8.3.3.2) 392 Summary (8.4) 397 Practice 397 Class Activities 398 Labs 398 Packet Tracer Activities 398 Check Your Understanding Questions 398 Chapter 9: Troubleshooting the Network 401 Objectives 401 Key Terms 401 Introduction (9.0.1.1) 402 Troubleshooting with a Systematic Approach (9.1) 402 Network Documentation (9.1.1) 402 Documenting the Network (9.1.1.1) 403 Network Topology Diagrams (9.1.1.2) 406 Network Baseline Performance Level (9.1.1.3) 408 Establishing a Network Baseline (9.1.1.4) 409 Measuring Data (9.1.1.5) 412 Troubleshooting Process (9.1.2) 415 General Troubleshooting Procedures (9.1.2.1) 415 Gathering Symptoms (9.1.2.2) 417 Questioning End Users (9.1.2.3) 418 Isolating the Issue Using Layered Models (9.1.3) 419 Using Layered Models for Troubleshooting (9.1.3.1) 419 Troubleshooting Methods (9.1.3.2, 9.1.3.3) 422 Guidelines for Selecting a Troubleshooting Method (9.1.3.4) 425 Network Troubleshooting (9.2) 426 Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1) 426 Software Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1.1, 9.2.1.2) 426 Hardware Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1.3) 431 Using a Syslog Server for Troubleshooting (9.2.1.4) 435 Symptoms and Causes of Network Troubleshooting (9.2.2) 437 Physical Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.1) 437 Data Link Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.2) 439 Network Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.3) 441 Transport Layer Troubleshooting - ACLs (9.2.2.4) 443 Transport Layer Troubleshooting - NAT for IPv4 (9.2.2.5) 445 Application Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.6) 446 Troubleshooting IP Connectivity (9.2.3) 448 Components of Troubleshooting End-to-End Connectivity (9.2.3.1) 448 End-to-End Connectivity Problem Initiates Troubleshooting (9.2.3.2) 450 Step 1 - Verify the Physical Layer (9.2.3.3) 452 Step 2 - Check for Duplex Mismatches (9.2.3.4) 454 Step 3 - Verify Layer 2 and Layer 3 Addressing on the Local Network (9.2.3.5) 456 Step 4 - Verify Default Gateway (9.2.3.6) 461 Step 5 - Verify Correct Path (9.2.3.7) 464 Step 6 - Verify the Transport Layer (9.2.3.8) 468 Step 7 - Verify ACLs (9.2.3.9) 469 Step 8 - Verify DNS (9.2.3.10) 471 Summary (9.3) 474 Practice 475 Class Activities 475 Packet Tracer Activities 475 Check Your Understanding Questions 476 Appendix A: Answers to the "Check Your Understanding" Questions 479 Glossary 499 TOC, 9781587133329, 3/25/2014show more

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