Conditions in the Paint Creek District, West Virginia; Hearings Sixty-Third Congress, First Session Pursuant to S. Res. 37, a Resolution Authorizing the Appointment of a Committee to Make an Investigation of Conditions in the Volume 3

Conditions in the Paint Creek District, West Virginia; Hearings Sixty-Third Congress, First Session Pursuant to S. Res. 37, a Resolution Authorizing the Appointment of a Committee to Make an Investigation of Conditions in the Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ... was questioning you about--he spoke in reference to the operators of the three competitive States having the authority or the right to vote in the general conference and arriving at or fixing the scale of wages for West Virginia operators in the event those operators entered the joint conference--would not the operators of West Virginia have the same right or authority as exercised in each of the other States to vote in fixing the scale of prices that would obtain in the other competitive States?--A. Absolutely; yes; and the same right to establish conditions of employment in those fields. If they thought they were not getting a square deal there they could establish general relations with our people here. Q. Then West Virginia would have the same representation and authority to act in the conferences as would any of the other States that enter and participate in the general conference?--A. Yes, sir. By Mr. Knight: Q. You spoke of the national operators' organization possibly leading to a getting together of the operators and the miners in one conference. That national organization has nothing to do with the labor question, as nonunion as well as union operators belong to it, and they could not deal with labor questions.--A. No; the operators of the organized States want to deal with the organized mine workers of the country and did organize last fall what they called the National Federation of Mine Operators, the aim of which, so I have been told and see by the notices, is to make more effective a uniform agreement without these sectional conferences being held throughout the country. Q. Is the national association you speak of restricted to the unionized mines?--A. I suppose they are all organized. (The commission then, at 5 o'clock p. m., ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236646649
  • 9781236646644