Conditions in the Coal Mines of Colorado; In the Matter of the Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Mines and Mining, House of Representatives, Sixty-Third Congress, Second Session, Pursuant to House Resolution 387,

Conditions in the Coal Mines of Colorado; In the Matter of the Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Mines and Mining, House of Representatives, Sixty-Third Congress, Second Session, Pursuant to House Resolution 387,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...unendurable injustice can not, however, escape attention. Alone and unsupported, a grievance of this character is so insistent and pervasive as to foreshadow, and, if unrelieved, compel industrial revolt in the form of strikes. It lends color to every charge of greed. The miner is persuaded that his pocket is being daily, hourly, 'and systematically plundered. Nothing compensates for this growing sense of Wrong; and the talk of good wages from a feudalism purporting to be benevolent, presents itself to the worker only in the light of hypocritical denial of the wages to which the worker is really entitled, and of which he is admittedly and continuously deprived. THE MATTER OF WAGES. As just suggested, confronted by uncontroverted conditions and grievances like these, the operators seek to divert attention from them by the citation of individual cases of alleged good wages. From thousands of employees, they choose selected instances on which unstintedly to pride themselves. It mi ht naturally be suggested that their feudalism has the added simi arity to its medieval model of occasional favorites and beneficiaries and instances are even paraded to conceal the general practice. No adequate light is attempted to be thrown by the operators--not to mention the injustices already complained of--on the cost of living, on deductions, on averages, or on annual earnings in an occupation admittedly both seasonal and dangerous. At the outset it is asserted and apparently conceded that higher wages are id to coal miners in Wyoming than in Colorado (pp. 84, 86). Osgood's statement is as follows (p. 431): The day wage for timber men in Wyoming is $3.45 a day; in ('olorado $3.12 a day; for track layers it is the same; for shot firers they pay...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236913493
  • 9781236913494