A Concise Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities; Based on Sir William Smith's Larger Dictionary, and Incorporating the Results of Modern Research

A Concise Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities; Based on Sir William Smith's Larger Dictionary, and Incorporating the Results of Modern Research

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...throng mothers was in the Homeric period recognised, as well as that through fathers, over the whole of Greece; and this would partly account for the high position attributed to women in Homer. After the Homeric age, the position of women declined. This may be due partly to the development of city life and of duties for which women were less fitted than for those of the simpler patriarchal community; partl to Oriental influence through Ionia; partly soto the importance attached to purity of race as citizenship came tobehanded down from father to son. All these influences tend to separatiwomen from men and confine them to a. comparative seclusion, as in the East. In spite of instances to the contrary, such as those of Korinna at Thebes, 500 B.C., and Sappho in the sixth century, women in the whole of Greece no longer share the life of the 406 men, as the matrons and maidens of the Homeric ms do. By the middle of the fifth century 3.0. the restriction of the libert of free-born citizen women attained its full evelopment in Northern Greece, the colonies in Asia, the islands of the Aegean, and the northem part of the Peloponnesus itself. In Sparta, however, women enjoyed an au thority and distinction rarely accorded to them even in modern times. With Sparta, Crete and Kyrene may be reckoned. The dowries of wives at Sparta were large, and there were many heiresses. Aristotle tells us (Pol. ii. 9) that two-fifths of the soil of Lakonia was possessed by women. Hence the Spartan women enjoyed a higher consideration than those of the rest of Greece. Before marriage, the Spartan girl passed an open-air life of continuous exercise; she wrestled and raced with her equals (Xen. Rrqi. Lac. i. 4); the society of young men was not forbidden to her, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 548 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 28mm | 966g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236953452
  • 9781236953452