Computational Methods in Photonics and Nanophotonics

Computational Methods in Photonics and Nanophotonics : A Comprehensive Overview and Introduction

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Description

All set to become an essential textbook for students of this topic, this is the first detailed and self-contained introduction to numerical electromagnetics in the context of photonics. As such it discusses and compares the most important and widely spread computational methods in nanophotonics, backed by problems, both on the analytical and the numerical level, as well as additional online simulations. Authored by highly renowned researchers, this is of interest to both theoretical and experimental scientists.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 440 pages
  • 170 x 240mm
  • Blackwell Verlag GmbH
  • Berlin, Germany
  • 3527410791
  • 9783527410798

Table of contents

1. A Review of Maxwell's Equations 1.1 Microscopic and Macroscopic Maxwell's Equations 1.2 Kramers-Kronig Relations 1.3 Boundary Conditions 1.4 Material models (Linear Dispersive, Linear Anisotropic, Nonlinear) 2. Introduction/Basic Concepts of the Numerical Analysis of Maxwell's equations 2.1 Discussion of Time-domain, Frequency-domain and Eigenmode Analysis 2.2 Auxiliary Differential Equations 2.3 Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) including PMLs 2.4 Example: 1d FDTD 3. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method 3.1 General Discretization with Finite Differences (2d/3d) 3.2 Numerical Dispersion 3.3 Sources (Current Sources and Total-field/Scattered-field Sources) 3.4 Boundary Conditions 3.5 Losses (averaging in Time to maintain Order) 3.6 Subpixel-smoothing (Treatment of Interfaces) 3.7 Performance Characteristics and Practical Implementation 4. Advanced Topics on FDTD 4.1 Nonlinear FDTD 4.2 Advanced Time-stepping 4.3 Higher-order FD and Pseudo-spectral Methods 4.4 Finding Eigenmodes 4.5 Finite-differences Frequency-domain 4.6 Performance Characteristics and Practical Implementation 5. Fourier Modal Method (FMM) 5.1 Photonic Bandstructure Computations 5.2 Fourier-factorization-rules 5.3 Sources 5.4 Adaptive Spatial Resolution 5.5 Non-periodic Systems: FMM as a Bi-directional Beam-propagation Method 5.6 Performance Characteristics and Practical Implementation 6. Classical Finite Element Method (FEM) 6.1 Classical Nodal FEM 6.2 Vector elements 6.3 FEM in the time-domain 6.4 Performance Characteristics and Practical Implementation 7. Discontinuous FEM 7.1 Spatial Discretization, Numerical Flux and the Riemann Problem 7.2 Discontinuous Galerkin Time-domain Method and Discontinuous Galerkin Frequency-domain Method 7.3 Dispersive Materials, ABCs, and Sources 7.4 Performance Characteristics and Practical Implementation 8. Practical Aspects and Applications 8.1 Integrated Optics: Waveguides and Resonators 8.2 Metallic Nanostructures 8.3 Photonic Crystal Devices Appendix A: Exact Reference solutions Appendix B: Solutions to Selected Problems
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About Kurt Busch

Kurt Busch received his Ph.D. degree from the Physics Department of the University of Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, in 1996. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto from 1997 to 1999 and head of a Junior Research Group within the Emmy-Noether Programme of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) at the Institute of Condensed Matter Theory at the University of Karlsruhe from 2000 to 2003. In 2004, he joined the University of Central Florida. as an Associate Professor with a joint appointment between the Department of Physics and the College of Optics and Photonics. Since 2005 he has been Professor at the Institute of Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics in Karlsruhe. He is a member of the DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN) and of the Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP). Professor Busch's research interests lie in the areas of computational photonics and the theory of light propagation and light-matter interaction in strongly scattering systems. This research has led to the Carl Zeiss Research Award 2006. Kurt Busch has co-edited three books and is co-author of some 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Jens Niegemann received his Ph.D. degree from the Physics Department of the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, in 2009. Afterwards, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics of the same university. Since 2010 he has been head of a Young Investigator Group at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. His research interests include computational nanophotonics, photonic crystals and photonic metamaterials. Jens Niegemann is co-author of some 15 articles in peer-reviewed journals.
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