A Comprehensive History of India, Civil, Military and Social; From the First Landing of the English, to the Suppression of the Sepoy Revolt Including an Outline of the Early History of Hindoostan Volume 3

A Comprehensive History of India, Civil, Military and Social; From the First Landing of the English, to the Suppression of the Sepoy Revolt Including an Outline of the Early History of Hindoostan Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ... rejoined the general. "None whatever," was th"e reply; "I am certain the thing will succeed. What I want you to do is to have two regiments and guns got quickly ready, and without making any show, to be prepared the moment required to move towards Mahomed Khans fort." With more good sense and greater firmness than he usually displayed, the general continued to remonstrate till the envoy, rather rudely, cut him short by exclaiming, " Leave it all to me; I understand these things better than you do."' He proceeds About noon of the 23d the envov passed out of cantonments, accompanied to a conference with by Lawrence, Trevor, and Mackenzie, and escorted by a few horsemen. The place of meeting was about 600 yards east of the cantonments, not far from the banks of the river where it is crossed by a bridge. It was situated on a slope among some hillocks, and was marked out by a number of horse-cloths, which had been spread for the occasion. While passing along, the envoy remembered that a beautiful Arab horse, which he had purchased from the owner at a high price, with the intention of presenting it to Akbar Khan, who was known to have coveted it, had been left behind. He therefore desired Captain Mackenzie to return for it, and in the meantime conversed with the other two officers on the subject which was nearest his heart. He was playing, he admitted, for a heavy stake, but the prize was worth the risk. Unable, however, to suppress misgivings, he is said to have remarked. "Death is preferable to the life we are leading now." After the usual salutations and some conversation on horse-Ad. Imi. back, during which Akbar Khan was profuse in his thanks for the present of the Arab steed, and also for that of a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 444 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 23mm | 789g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236633660
  • 9781236633668