The Complete Works of William Shakespeare; With Explanatory & Historical Notes by the Most Eminent Commentators Volume 2

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare; With Explanatory & Historical Notes by the Most Eminent Commentators Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$79.26

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1838 edition. Excerpt: ...men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in trar Blare, --' But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Brutus, and Caesar: What should be in that Caesar'1 Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together, yours is as fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with them Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar. (Shout) Now in the names of all the gods at once, Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed, That he is grown so great? Age, thou art sham'd: Home, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods! When went there by an age, since the great flood, But it was fam'd with more than with one man? When could they say, till now, that talk'd of Uomr That her wide walks eucompass'd but one man A Now is it Rome indeed, and room enough, When there is in it but one only man. I O! yi-u and I have heard our lathers say, . There was a Brutus once, that would have brook'd The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome, As easily as a king. Bru. That you do love me, I am nothing jealous; What you would work me to, I have some aim: How 1 have thought of this, and of these times, I shall recount hereafter; for this present, I would not, so with love 1 might entreat you, Be any further mov'd. What you have said, I will consider; what you have to say, I will with patience hear: and find a time Both meet to hear, and answer, such high things. Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this; Brutus had rather be a villager, Than to repute himself a son of Rome Under these hard conditions as this time Is like to lay upon us. Cas. I am glad, that my weak words Have struck but thus much...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 748 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 38mm | 1,311g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236640632
  • 9781236640635