The Complete Works of William Makepeace Thackeray; With Illustrations by the Author, and with Introductory Notes Setting Forth the History of the Several Works in Twenty-Two Volumes Volume 17

The Complete Works of William Makepeace Thackeray; With Illustrations by the Author, and with Introductory Notes Setting Forth the History of the Several Works in Twenty-Two Volumes Volume 17

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...a Radical, and almost a Republican (in opposition, perhaps, to his father, who, of course, held the highly respectable line of politics)--Mr. Sansculotte Phil was personally one of the most aristocratic and overbearing of young gentlemen; and had a contempt and hatred for mean people, for base people, for servile people, and especially for too familiar people, which was not a little amusing sometimes, which was provoking often, but which he never was at the least pains of disguising. His uncle and cousin Twysden, for example, he treated not half so civilly as their footmen. Little Talbot humbled himself before Phil, and felt not always easy in his company. Young Twysden hated him, and did not disguise his sentiments at the club, or to their mutual acquaintance behind Phil's broad back. And Phil, for his part, adopted towards his cousin a kick-me-down-stairs manner, which I own must have been provoking to that gentleman who was Phil's senior by three years, a clerk in a public office, a member of several good clubs, and altogether a genteel member of society. Phil would often forget Ringwood Twysden's presence, and pursue his own conversation entirely regardless of Ringwood's observations. He was very rude, I own. Que voidez-vous? We have all of us our little failings, and one of Philip's was an ignorant impatience of bores, parasites, and pretenders. So no wonder my young gentleman was not very fond of his father's friend, the dingy jail chaplain. I, who am the most tolerant man in the world, as all my friends know, liked Hunt little better than Phil did. The man's presence made me uneasy. His dress, his complexion, his teeth, his leer at women--Que sais-je?--everything was unpleasant about this Mr. Hunt, and his gayety and familiarity...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236798848
  • 9781236798848