Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge; With an Introductory Essay Upon His Philosophical and Theological Opinions Volume 2

Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge; With an Introductory Essay Upon His Philosophical and Theological Opinions Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...for his moral and intellectual appetites, by physical experiments and philosophical research, by acquiring knowledge for himself and communicating it to his wife and children. Would he be useful then? Ho useful!' The state would lose nothing although the vine-dresser and his land were both swallowed up by an earthquake!' Well then, instead of devoting the latter half of each day to his closet, his laboratory, or to neighborly conversation, suppose he goes to the vineyard, and from the ground which would maintain in health, virtue, and wisdom, twenty of his fellow-creatures, helps to raise a quantity of liquor that will disease the bodies and debauch the souls of a hundred--Is he useful now? O yes! a very useful man, and a most excellent citizen.f In what then does the law between state and state differ from that between man and man? For hitherto we seem to have discovered no variation. The law of nations is the law of common honesty, modified by the circumstances in which states dift fer from individuals. According to my best understanding, the difference may be reduced to this one point: that the influence of example in any extraordinary case, as the possible occasion of an action apparently like, though in reality very different, is of Well, and in the spirit of genuine philosophy, does the poet describe such beings as men Who being innocent do for that cause Bestir them in good deeds Wordsworth. Providence, by the ceaseless activity which it has implanted in our nature, has sufficiently guarded against an innocence without virtue. (-So in Jollie's and Hutchinson's History of Cumberland, the writer speaks of a small estatesman, bred to a rural life, who can not betake himself from an indolent habit to manufacturing and labor!--Tntrod. p. 39, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 188 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 345g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236624238
  • 9781236624239