A Complete View of the Dress and Habits of the People of England; From the Establishment of the Saxons in Britain to the Present Time ... to Which Is Prefixed an Introduction, Containing a General Description of the Ancient Volume 2

A Complete View of the Dress and Habits of the People of England; From the Establishment of the Saxons in Britain to the Present Time ... to Which Is Prefixed an Introduction, Containing a General Description of the Ancient Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...called the Eulggium, who probably wrote about this time, speaks to the same purpose: " The commons," says he, "were TM besotted in excess of apparel; some in wide surcoats reaching to their loins; Q" some in a garment reaching to their heels, close before, and strutting out on the 60"" sides, so that at the back they make men seem like women; and this they call by a ridiculous name, gowne; their hoods are little, tied under the chin, and buttoned like the women's, but set with gold, silver, and precious stones; their lirripippes, or tippets, pass round the neck, and, hanging down before, reach to the heels, all jagged; they have another weed of silk, which they call a paltock, their hose are of two colours, or pied with more, which they tie to their paltocks, with white latchets called herlots, without any breeches; their girdles are of gold and silver, and some of them worth twenty markes; their shoes and pattens are snouted and piked more than a finger long, crooking upwards, which they call crackowes, resembling devil's clawes, and fastened to the knees with chains of gold and silver." Henry the Fourth, soon after his accession to the throne, revived the sumptuary statutes of Edward the Third; but, if they had then been strenuously carried into execution, Thomas Occliif, who wrote in the reign of that monarch, would not have had the occasion of complaint which he exhibits against the extravagance of dress existent in his time.' This poet, after enumerating many things requiring amendment, comes to the subject of apparel; "and this," says he, "in my thinking, is an evil, to see one walking in gownes of scarlet twelve yards wide, with sleeves reaching to the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 126 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236800648
  • 9781236800640