A Complete Scientific Grammar of the English Language; With an Appendix Containing a Treatise on Composition, Specimens of English and American Literature, a Defense of Phonetics &C., &C., for the Use of Colleges, Schools, and Private

A Complete Scientific Grammar of the English Language; With an Appendix Containing a Treatise on Composition, Specimens of English and American Literature, a Defense of Phonetics &C., &C., for the Use of Colleges, Schools, and Private

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...more carefully, he would improve more rapidly. 6. Had he known the difficulties of the work, he would have shrunk from it. 7. Our freedom would be useless, if it were not for the intelligence of the people. 8. I wish that the gentleman were present himself. 9. I wish that he had been present himself on that occasion. 10. I wished then that I knew my lesson more thoroughly. 11. He wished then that he had prepared his lesson more carefully. 12. You will then wish that you knew more of the Sciences. 13. They will then wish that they had studied the Sciences more diligently. INFINITIVES. Use. Infinitives are always used as Contractions, or Substitutes for Tense Forms. The Simple Infinitive usually denotes an unfinished, and the Compound Infinitive a finished, action. The To in Infinitives is not now used as a Preposition, but as a substitute for the former Infinitive Termination-an or-on. Former Use. The Sign " To " was originally a Preposition, meaning " for," and was followed, not by the Infinitive, but by a Participle (or Gerund) in the Dative Case, and ending with-nne. Omission. The "to " is usually omitted in Infinitives, following the words bid, dare, make, see, hear, feel, help, let, &c. AUXILIARIES. All the Auxiliaries were formerly principal Verbs, the Verbs after them being Infinitives. Do, Have, and Will, are frequently used as principal Verbs now. Do and Did, without Emphasis, are redundant and disagreeable, unless the principal Verb is omitted. The Termination of the 3d Person, Singular, in the Auxiliaries, is lost, except in Do and Have. Emphasis often modifies essentially the meaning of the Auxiliaries. The Potential Future Tensa, with Emphasis on the Auxiliaries, is indefinite in regard to time, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 222g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236577000
  • 9781236577009