Complete Practical Treatise on Acids, Alkalies, and Salts; Their Manufacture and Application Being V.1, PT. 3-5 of Chemical Technology Or, Chemistry in Its Application Volume 1

Complete Practical Treatise on Acids, Alkalies, and Salts; Their Manufacture and Application Being V.1, PT. 3-5 of Chemical Technology Or, Chemistry in Its Application Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...products with nitric acid and distil ofi' the hydrochloric acid, thus obtaining the nitrate of chromium and of the base of the chrome--salt. They then heat these nitrates and condense the lower oxides of nitrogen which are given off, in the following manner: The gases are conveyed into a vessel containing water, by a pipe dipping below the surface of the water. Air is permitted to enter into this vessel and to mix with the gas which bubbles through the water. This mixture of air and nitrous gas is drawn, by a pneumatic apparatus, through a series of vessels similar to the first, each containing a tube dipping into the liquid, and another tube or pipe attached to its top to connect it with the next vessel, thus making the nitrous gas to pass alternately into air and water, by which means it is converted into nitric acid. Thus, when 3N O' is passed into water at a temperature of 100 F. or upwards, 2N0' + NO' results, the 2N0' (i.e., two atoms of nitric acid) remain in solution, while the NO', which is uncondensable gas, bubbles through the liquid and mixes with the air in the vessel above the liquid; it instantly takes two atoms of oxygen from the air, and becomes NO', which, passing again through the liquid, becomes nitric acid and nitrous gas as before, and thus nearly the whole of the nitrous vapour or gas is reconverted into nitric acid. When the temperature of the liquid into which the nitrous gas is passed, is much under 100 F., a slightly different but equally beneficial reaction ensues. The residue, after heating the nitrates, consists of the chromate or bichromate first employed, and can again be used. The patentees prefer to use the chromate of lime. Shanks's process consists in placing a quantity...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 234 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236504437
  • 9781236504432