The Complete Farmer; Or, a General Dictionary of Husbandry. in Which Everything Valuable from the Best Writers on This Subject Will Be Extracted

The Complete Farmer; Or, a General Dictionary of Husbandry. in Which Everything Valuable from the Best Writers on This Subject Will Be Extracted

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1807 edition. Excerpt: ...by whatever name they may be called, will unquestionably make good cyder. But it has been remarked by Mr. Knight, that the properties which constitute a good apple for cyder and the desert, are seldom found in the same fruit. The firmness of pulp, which is essential in an eating-apple, is useless, he says, in the cyder-fruit; and colour, which is disregarded in the former, is amongst the first qualities (c)f the latter: some degree of astringency, which is injurious to the eating-fruit, Is likewise, he conceives, advantageous to the other. See Apple. In gathering the apples for this liquor, care should be taken that they be thoroughly ripe before they are taken from the tree; otherwise the cyder will be of a rough, harsh taste, in spite of all the endeavours of the operator. It is observed by Mr. Crockor in his tract on the Art of Making and Managing Cyder, that the most certain indications of the ripeness of apples is the fragrance of their smell, and their spontaneously dropping from the trees. When they are in this state of maturity, in a dry day, the limbs may, he says, be slightly shaken, and partly disburdened of their guldeu Store; thus taking such apples only as are ripe, and leaving the unripe longer on the trees, that they may also acquire a due degree of maturity. It may not, he thinks, be amiss to make three gather, ings of the crop, keeping each by itself. The latter gathering, as well as winl-falls, can however only be employed in making inferior cyder: the prime cyder must be drawn from the former gatherings. According to the writer first mentioned, the merit of cyder wiH always depend much on the proper mixture, or rather on proper separation, of the fruits. Those whose rinds and pulp are tinged with green, or red without any.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 906 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 45mm | 1,583g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236611829
  • 9781236611826