The Complete English Traveller; Or, a New Survey and Description of England and Wales, Containing a Full Account of Whatever Is Curious and Entertaining in the Several Counties of England and Wales, the Isles of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, and

The Complete English Traveller; Or, a New Survey and Description of England and Wales, Containing a Full Account of Whatever Is Curious and Entertaining in the Several Counties of England and Wales, the Isles of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1771 edition. Excerpt: ...it is-possible for a woman endowed with common fense to believe, that the most solemn oath of a man can be taken, when to obtain the gratification of a sensual passion, he solicits the person, whom he pretends to love, to become a prostitute to his lusts? No. Let every young woman, yea, and every woman in general remember, that the man who pays no regard to moral obligations, during a state of courtship, will never be faithful to the marriage vow. Let no such one be trusted. Shakespear. There is another rock upon which many young women have unhappily fallen, and which in many cafes has promoted their ruin, although the gracious God, who gave them being, designed it to make them an ho. nour to their sex, we mean that of superior accomplishments with respect to wit and knowledge: we couldwish to see every woman both wise and learned, but we could wish at the same time that they were so cloathed with humility as not to know it. For no sooner does a woman, pride herself pn her superior accomplishments; than she is set up as an object proper to be ruined by the hell-rakes of the town; and if she is so unhappy asto fall a victim to her own folly, her sex, who ought to pity her, too often expose her frailty to the world, and cruelly laugh at her misfortune. Female pretentions to wit were never so finely described as in the following lines: Nor make to dang'tous wit a vain pretence, But quietly rest, content with modest sense; For wit, like wine, intoxicates the brain, Too strong for feeble woman to contain, Of those who claim it more then half have none, And half of those who have it are undone. Lord Lyttelton. But the principal thing for which women in general value themselves, is their beauty, or, in other words, their exterior appearance, whether...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 916 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 46mm | 1,601g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539850
  • 9781236539854