The Complete Dramatic and Poetical Works of William Shakespeare; With a Summary Outline of the Life of the Poet, and a Description of His Most Authentic Portraits, Collected from the Latest and Most Reliable Sources, by John S. Hart to

The Complete Dramatic and Poetical Works of William Shakespeare; With a Summary Outline of the Life of the Poet, and a Description of His Most Authentic Portraits, Collected from the Latest and Most Reliable Sources, by John S. Hart to

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...we turned o'er many books tK'"1: he is furnished with my opinion; which, bettered with his own learning, the greatness whereof I cannot enough commend, comes with him, at my importunity, to fill up your grace's request in my stead. I beseech you, let his lack of years be no impediment to let him lack a reverend estimation; for i never knew so young a body with so old a head-i leave him to your gracious acceptance, whose trial shall better publish his commendation. Duke. You hear the learn'd Bellario, what he Aud here, I take it, is the doctor come. writes: Enter Portia, dressed like a doctor of laws. Give me your hand. Come you from old Bellario? Por. I did, my lord. Duke. You are welcome: take your place. Are you acquainted with the difference That holds this present question in the court? Pur. I am informed throughly of the cause. Which is the merchant here, and which the Jew? Duke. Antonio and old Shylock, both stand forth. Por. Is your name Shylock't Shy. Shylock is my name. Por. Of a strange nature is the suit you follow: Yet in such rule that the Venetian law Cannot impugn you as you do proceed. You stand within his danger, do you not? Ant. Ay, so lie says. Por. Do you confess the bond V Ant. I do. Por. Then must the Jew be merciful. Shy. On what compulsion must I V tell me that. Por. The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown: His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway; It is enthroned in the hearts of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 458 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 812g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236638212
  • 9781236638212