A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations Volume 5 (1650-1661)

A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations Volume 5 (1650-1661)

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1816 edition. Excerpt: ...and so downward to his Grace that now sits in his Chair, Primate of II England and Metropolitan. So that he makes the succession of Bishops from St. Pttcr-and the See of Home, to beu sure and infallible sign of the true Church, and herein shews himself to be a perfect Papist. All this bespeaks by occasion of the Bi'hop's chair, which he saith is placed in the Chancel, which is a degree holier than the body of the Church. 4. But yet he affirms a holier plnce than both these, and that he calls 'Sacrarinni, ' or 'sanctum sanctorum, ' the hcly of holies, and this he thus describes; it is a place at the upper end of the Chancel, inclosed and railed in from the rest of the Chancel, whereinto none may enter but the Priests themselves, and none else, no not the King, without a dispensation. This he clears, as he saith, out of the history of Theodoiius the Emperor, who when the time of offering gifts was come, rose up, and with tears went into the holy place, and after his oblation stood within the rails: but St. Ambiosc, saith he, put him in mind o( the difference of places, and told him that that part of the Sacrarinm or Chancel within the rails, was only for Priests, and no other might enter in there, or so much as touch them. And so he, fair and mannerly, bad the nature of Orders nnd the indelible character of the 'Priesthood, (which seems to be derived from it) Campbell's Lectures upon Ecclesiastical History. The objection to the English Orders derived From the story of the Nag's Head ordination (as 'a is called, pei haps consecration or episcopation would be a more exact name) seems to be extremely refined and subtle; since it d cs not appear to be questioned that Parker and his brethren had been apostolically ordained Dencons and Priests. See...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 714 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 36mm | 1,252g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570758
  • 9781236570758