The Complete Angler of Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton; Estensively Embellished with Engravings on Copper and Wood, from Original Paintings and Drawings, by First-Rate Artists, to Which Are Added, an Introductory Essay, the Linn an

The Complete Angler of Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton; Estensively Embellished with Engravings on Copper and Wood, from Original Paintings and Drawings, by First-Rate Artists, to Which Are Added, an Introductory Essay, the Linn an

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ... as namely, with powdered beef, with a Lob, or Gardenworm, with a Minnow, or gut of a Hen, Chicken, or 'the guts of any fish, or with almost any thing, for he is a greedy fish; but the Eel may be caught especially with a little, a very little Lamprey, which some call a Pride, and may in the hot months be found many of them in the river Thames, and in many mud-heaps in other rivers, yea, almost as usually as one finds worms in a dunghill. Next note, that the Eel seldom stirs in the day, but then hides himself, and therefore he is usually caught by night, with one of these baits of which I have spoken, and may be then caught by laying hooks, which you are to fasten to the bank, or twigs of a tree; or by throwing a string cross the stream with many hooks at it, and those baited with the aforesaid baits, and a clod, or plummet, or stone, thrown into the river with this line, that so you may in the morning find it near to some fixed place, and then take it up with a drag-hook or otherwise: but these things are indeed too common to be spoken of, and an hour's fishing with any Angler will teach you better both for these and many other common things in the practical part of Angling, than a week's discourse. I shall therefore conclude this direction for taking-the Eel, by telling you, that in a warm day in summer, I have taken many a good Eel by Snigling, and have been much pleased with that sport. And because you that are but a young Angler, know not what Snigling is, I will now teach it to you. You remember I told you that Eels do not usually stir in the day-time, for then they hide themselves under some covert, or under boards or planks about flood-gates, or wears, or mills, or in holes in the river-banks; so that you observing your time in a warm day, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236486439
  • 9781236486431