A Compleat View of Episcopacy; As Exhibited from the Fathers of the Christian Church, Until the Close of the Second Century Containing an Impartial Account of Them, of Their Writings, and of What They Say Concerning Bishops and

A Compleat View of Episcopacy; As Exhibited from the Fathers of the Christian Church, Until the Close of the Second Century Containing an Impartial Account of Them, of Their Writings, and of What They Say Concerning Bishops and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1771 edition. Excerpt: ...that he knew nothing of them. But this is not all. Nothing more common with Irenaeus, than to have have recourse to the Vocal sayings of those that were ancienter than himself; and a great number of them are introduced, in the very same manner with these words of Ignatius, " as such an one said." And as Irenaeus was acquainted with Polycarp, Ignatius's contemporary, and a vast number of other ancients; why might he not have received this saying from them, as what had been uttered by Ignatius, in the day of his martyrdom? nor is this meer conjecture only. For these very words are mentioned by Jerom, as delivered by Ignatius in his last sufferings. His words are these: " Now, when he had been condemned to the beasts, and in the heat of his suffering had heard the roaring of the lions, he said, I am the corn of Christ, lam ground wit h. the teeth of beasts, that I may be found pure bread. And " the acts of Ignatius's martyrdom," both the Greek and Latin acts, exhibit the fame account with Jerom; and so do Simeon the Metaphrast, and the Roman breviary. Episcopalians will not deny, that H h these these words were uttered by Ignatius, in the time of his suffering. What difficulty can there then be in supposing, that Irenaeus should make mention of them, as a known, memorable Saying of his? And why should not this be rather supposed, than that he should take them from that "epistle" which is attributed to him as its author?Especially, as there are such notorious circumstances, all conspiring to encourage the thought, that he never saw it. ' " Cum jam damnatus eflet ad bestias, et ardore pstiendi, rugientes audiret leones, ait: frumentum Christi sum, dentibus bestiarum molor, ut panis mundusshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236611330
  • 9781236611338