Compendium Theologicum; Or, Manual for Students Containing a Concise History of the Primitive and Mediaeval Church, the Reformation, the Church of England, the English Liturgy and Bible, and the XXXIX Articles

Compendium Theologicum; Or, Manual for Students Containing a Concise History of the Primitive and Mediaeval Church, the Reformation, the Church of England, the English Liturgy and Bible, and the XXXIX Articles

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...by the nature of the argument, the true character of God. The same persons consider the words he thought it not robbery, to be used in a figurative sense, and to mean that he did not desire or aim at it greedily, as robbers do; or they take dpvaypoc (robbery), as used for apvayfta, which they render, a thing to be vehemently desired or caught at. But neither the usage of the Greek language, nor the ordinary style of the Apostle, warrant such an artificial, and far-fetched rendering. 282. Further, the names, attributes, and operations of Deity are assigned to Christ in the following passages: Acts xx. 28; John iii. 16; Titus ii. 13; James ii. 1; Rev. i. 8, and xix. 16. Also in the passages cited from the Septuagint Version of the Old Testament by the writers of the New; the name Jehovah is applied to Christ. The creation, preservation, and government of all things, are likewise ascribed to him in Col. i. 16, 17; Matt. xi. 27, and ix. 6; John ii. 25; v. 25, 28; vi. 39, 40; xiv. 13, and xv. 26. 283. Another argument for the Divinity of Christ is derived from the fact, that the unity of the Deity as an object of worship is maintained not only in the Old, but in the New Testament, as in Matt. iv. 10; Acts xiv. 15, and xvii. 29; 1 Thess. i. 9; Rev. xix. 10. Therefore the worship ascribed to him as to Deity in many places, as in Luke xxiv. 52; 3 Cor. xii. 8, 9; Phil. ii. 10; Heb. i. 5; Rev. v. 8; and, above all, St Stephen's last prayer, in Acts vii. 59, 60, --prove that he was regarded as God. 284. Lastly, it does not appear, that the Jews anywhere accused the Christians of idolatry for this direct worship of Christ, or that they considered it inconsistent with his claim to he the Messiah, for they applied the words in Exod. xxiii. 20,21, and Hag. ii....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659759
  • 9781236659750