A Compendious View of Universal History, from the Year 1753 to the Treaty of Amiens in 1802; With Notes, to Verify or Elucidate the Passages to Which They Refer Volume 3

A Compendious View of Universal History, from the Year 1753 to the Treaty of Amiens in 1802; With Notes, to Verify or Elucidate the Passages to Which They Refer Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1804 edition. Excerpt: ...by supplying it with fresh fuel; and that it tended to make the particular cause of thefactiou: the common cause ofthe great body of the people.--He then proceeds to describe the situation and circumstances of the emigrant princes.--" Monsieur le comte d'Artois " had quitted France in 1789. He went, the ensuing year, to Coblentz, the place appointed for the rendezvous of the emigrants. In a short time, the prince was surrounded with more than " two-thirds of the French noblesse, and a great number of malecontents of the other orders. No " means, either of invitation or reproach, was now spared, to induce those to leave their homes and their occupations who either seemed determined not to quit the kingdom, or doubted respecting the expediency of doing it. Every road was covered with men, women, and children, and even the aged, who repaired from all parts to this rallying point. N0 Obstacle could resist this incli" nation to emigrate. The jacobins, whose interests were so effectually promoted by it, not content " to favour it by conniving at it, forced the more irresolute to emigrate by persecution and outrage. But, if it may be asserted with truth that fear was the principal motive with some, as ambition " was with others, we cannot deny that honour and a sense of duty actuated the greater part of " those who pressed to offer the prince, not only their swords and their lives, but the wrecks of " their fortunes."--The count afterwards adverts to the injury which the princes had done their own cause by their self-confidence, their contempt of their adversary, and the high tone in which they talked, and by thciriflpresumptuous, unaccommodating spirit. " Those who arrived...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123681729X
  • 9781236817297