A Comparative Grammar of the Teutonic Languages; Being at the Same Time a Historical Grammar of the English Language. and Comprising Gothic, Anglo-Saxon, Early English, Modern English, Icelandic (Old Norse), Danish, Swedish, Old High

A Comparative Grammar of the Teutonic Languages; Being at the Same Time a Historical Grammar of the English Language. and Comprising Gothic, Anglo-Saxon, Early English, Modern English, Icelandic (Old Norse), Danish, Swedish, Old High

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...A. S. te'on (tin, t n), O. H. Germ, zehan, bear their explanation in themselves, and the terminations of these numerals in the modern Teutonic dialects are easily explained as derivatives of the ancient forms. 20--90 The tigjui of the Goth, tvai-tigjns (20) having been explained already, we may confine ourselves to a short review of the corresponding forms and their peculiarities in the other Teutonic languages. The O. N. tiffi in ria-tigi and iu in fior-tiu are modifications of the fuller form tugu in tu-ttvgu, which, like the O. H. Germ, zitff in zwein-zug, represent the Goth, tigjus, a hase in u, daku from dakan (10); and quite as readily will be perceived the relation of A. S., O. S. tig, O. Fris. tick. The final consonant is dropped in the O. Engl, tuen-ti, N. Engl, twen-tg, with the usual change of the final i into y. The Swed. tio is the direct descendant of the O. N. tiu, while the Dan. dive undoubtedly owes its origin to some other source. Very characteristic in this form is the use of the labial aspirate for the guttural media, dive = dige, which is the reverse of the O. Fris. sigun for A. S. seofon, O. S. situn (7), and the A. S. nigon, O. Fris., O. S. nigun for the Goth. niun=niv-un, primitive nav-an. For the formation of the 'tens' from 'seventy' upwards, most of the Old Teutonic dialects use a word differing from tigjus in form and, to a certain extent, in derivation, though not in meaning;. The Goth, tehun-d, which is used in sibun-tehund (70), &c, pre-supposes, as we have explained before, a primitive dakan-ta, and answers in meaning to the Gr. StKas. This Jehund we meet in the other dialects in more or less modified forms. The whole form we find contracted in the O. H. Germ. o, sibnn-zo. Themost ancient mode of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539664
  • 9781236539663