Company "K," 155th Pa. Volunteer Zouaves; A Detailed History of Its Organization and Service to the Country During the Civil War from 1862 Until the Collapse of the Rebellion, Together with Many Incidents and Reminiscences of the Camp,

Company "K," 155th Pa. Volunteer Zouaves; A Detailed History of Its Organization and Service to the Country During the Civil War from 1862 Until the Collapse of the Rebellion, Together with Many Incidents and Reminiscences of the Camp,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888* edition. Excerpt: ...us on the railroad, where we could see and hear what was being done, and Capt. Oline being the ranking officer, was the commander of our Post. We perhaps had more real enjoyment daring the three months we remained here than during any other three months of our service, notwithstanding the boys had to be on guard about every alternate day and night. Jan. 26th. E. L. McGaughey returned from hospital. Feb. 3rd. Sergeant Marshall returned to the company after his furlough. February 4th. Corporal Schmuck and privates P. C. Hetrick, Henderson and Wolf returned from the hospital. February 6th. There were seven of Mosby's men captured and brought in that day--one of them a Major. There was considerable cannonading in the direction of the Rapidan, which we afterwards learned was the Third Corps across the river on a reconnoisance. February llth. The Christian Commission established a post at the Junction and put up a large chapel tent for religious services. We had brigade review the same day. We were reviewed by General Ayres, commanding our Division. Ours was the first Zouave Brigade in the Union. It was composed of the 140th and 146th-IT. Y., and 155th Pa. Next day there was an inspection of camp and of quarters. When there was no mud, our streets were swept as clean as a floor. February 14th (Sabbath). When we attempted to go to preaching at the Christian Commission Chapel, we "found a guard posted by some drunken officers, and all who were not dressed to please them were sent back. If they did not go immediately they were arrested. There was one man refused admission because he had worn a hat instead of his fez cap. We considered this as carrying matters too far, and it was never attempted again. February 17th. It was most dreadful cold weather. We...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236675703
  • 9781236675705