Communism and the Remorse of an Innocent Victimizer

Communism and the Remorse of an Innocent Victimizer

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Description

This memoir assesses life under a Communist regime. It attacks the stigma of the grim, fightening and oppressive regime is attacked and describes life as, for the most part, normal. People adjusted, bread had to be earned, families enjoyed each other's company. In the morally ambivalent world of communist Bulgaria everyone was both victim and victimizer. Few dissented, few intended evil. More typical were experiences of compliance, complicity, and informing on friends and neighbours just to get by. The author describes his own coming to terms with the harm done by compliance and his gradual shift into a more active political stance. The book challenges the assumptions about communism, democracy and eastern europe. There are chilling insights into the costs of complicity under Bulgarian communism which raise uncomfortable questions about the moral dimensions of "going along" in any system.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 224 pages
  • 166.1 x 244.9 x 22.4mm | 576.07g
  • Texas A & M University Press
  • College Station, United States
  • English
  • New
  • 19ill.1M.
  • 1585441953
  • 9781585441952

Review quote

"This is a remarkable narrative. I read it in a single sitting. It has bite, pace, and an excellent narrative flow. First person accounts of this quality are rare from behind the former Iron Curtain, rarer still from Bulgaria. The author has a Kundera-like Eastern European quality of introspection, and a searingly honest appraisal of his communist origins and upbringing, which makes the fall of communism and his personal disillusionment all the more poignant. The broader themes of history and politics are skillfully introduced, the turmoil they induced in Bulgaria is vividly represented. Contact with the Secret Police is presented with skill, the travail of Turkish peoples in Bulgaria is masterfully reported in the second section. . . .by far one of the most interesting works I've read from contemporary Eastern Europe."--Frederick Quinn, author of Democracy at Dawn--Frederick Quinn, author of Democracy at Dawn This is a remarkable narrative. I read it in a single sitting. It has bite, pace, and an excellent narrative flow. First person accounts of this quality are rare from behind the former Iron Curtain, rarer still from Bulgaria. The author has a Kundera-like Eastern European quality of introspection, and a searingly honest appraisal of his communist origins and upbringing, which makes the fall of communism and his personal disillusionment all the more poignant. The broader themes of history and politics are skillfully introduced, the turmoil they induced in Bulgaria is vividly represented. Contact with the Secret Police is presented with skill, the travail of Turkish peoples in Bulgaria is masterfully reported in the second section. . . .by far one of the most interesting works Ive read from contemporary Eastern Europe.--Frederick Quinn, author of Democracy at Dawn -- Frederick Quinn, author of Democracy at Dawnshow more

About Zaltko Anguelov

Zlatko Anguelov was born in Bulgaria in 1946. After earning his M.D., he taught anatomy in Varna and worked as a general practitioner in Sofia. He later contributed to western newspapers, worked with Bulgaria's Turkish minority, and wrote extensively on AIDS. In 1992, Anguelov moved to Canada, where he earned a degree in medical sociology. He currently edits a medical journal in Iowa.show more

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