The Commonwealth of Nations; An Inquiry Into the Nature of Citizenship in the British Empire, and Into the Mutual Relations of the Several Communities Thereof

The Commonwealth of Nations; An Inquiry Into the Nature of Citizenship in the British Empire, and Into the Mutual Relations of the Several Communities Thereof

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...force to the e Imperial Government in America. If HampBevolu-den was right in refusing to pay ship money, despite tion which, ., . eZ., V secured the tact that the public saiety demanded the mamsupportof tenance of a navy, the Americans were right in resistWashing mS the principle of the Stamp Act. The motive ton. which actuated most of the colonists in their resistance was, however, not the motive which actuated Hampden. It was the reluctance of the colonists to assume obligations which were really theirs, born of a system which had never compelled them to see that these burdens were not only theirs, but vital to their existence. Under the commercial system the political conscience of America had become dormant; but it was not dead, and it is hard indeed to imagine Washington and Hamilton and men like them, upon whom the ultimate success of the movement depended, justifying so sordid a motive for opposing the Imperial Government. The Stamp Act elevated what would otherwise have been the meanest of causes almost into a religious duty. The colonists would have been untrue to all that was best in their English tradition had they admitted the principle that a Parliament, while failing to open its doors to them, could assert the right to be master of their fate. One wholesome effect the Act had. For the first Chap. VI time it called into being a body which could in some Vwl sort think even if it could not act for the colonies as The a whole. Nine states sent representatives to a Con-congress0 gress at New York, which drew up the case for the f'vCd colonies in a statement of marked ability. They was the acknowledged not only that allegiance was due to the towards Crown, but likewise ' all due subordination to that tSty august body, the Parliament of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 242 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 440g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236680677
  • 9781236680679