Commons, Forests and Footpaths; The Story of the Battle During the Last Forty-Five Years for Public Rights Over the Commons, Forests and Footpaths of England and Wales

Commons, Forests and Footpaths; The Story of the Battle During the Last Forty-Five Years for Public Rights Over the Commons, Forests and Footpaths of England and Wales

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...time; that the timber on the remaining 13,000 acres should belong absolutely to His Majesty, discharged of estovers for ever, and of pannage for twenty-one years; that the whole waste of the Forest should be re-afforested, and be subjected to forestal law; but that this should not in future apply to the lands in private ownership, not waste of the Forest; that no more than 800 deer should be maintained by the Crown; and that all grants of the waste lands should be resumed and made void. These proposals were agreed to by the Committee of the House of Commons, 'and were recommended to the Government. A Bill was introduced to carry them into effect, but Parliament was prorogued before it became law, and it was not till 1668, that an Act was passed substantially embodying these terms. In the meantime Sir John Winter, under the powers of his lease, played havoc with the timber in the Forest. The Committee, in 1663, had already reported to the House " that Winter had 500 cutters of wood employed on the Forest, and that all the timber would be destroyed if care should not be speedily taken to prevent it." In vain the House of Commons made recommendations for the preservation of the timber. Winter still went on with his cuttings; and in 1667, it was reported to the Government that of 30,233 trees sold to Winter, only about 200 remained standing, and that from 7,000 to 8,000 loads of timber, suitable for the Navy, were found wanting. The Act of 1668 embodied with little variation the proposals of the people of the Forest, as approved by the Committee. It maintained all the rights of miners of the district. Strangely enough, after all the complaints of Winter's conduct, the Act saved his rights under his lease. Whether it was that he had already exhausted...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 142 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236673417
  • 9781236673411