Common Sense about the War

Common Sense about the War

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...all, oh, Brown, if you write to the papers giving your views of why we are at war--and if you don't you will be the only person who hasn't--don't be lured into slinging vulgar abuse at our opponents, lest America takes you for another university professor." There is, I learned, only one person In America about whom it is impossible, even in Sir James's opinion, to preserve a neutral attitude. This is the German Ambassador, whose splendid work for England day by day and in every paper and to all reporters cannot, Sir James thinks, be too cordially recognized. Brown has been told to look upon the German Ambasador as England's greatest asset in America just now, and to hope heartily that he will be long spared to carry on his admirable work. Lastly, it was pleasant to find that Brown has not a spark of sympathy with those who say that, because Germany has destroyed art treasures in Belgium and France, the Allies should retaliate with similar rudeness if they reach Berlin. He holds that if for any reason best known to themselves (such as the wish for a sunnier location) the Hohenzollerns should by and by vacate their present residence, a nice villa should be provided for them, and that all the ancestral statues in the Sieges-Allee should be conveyed to it intact, and perhaps put up in the back garden. There the Junkers could drop in of an evening, on their way home from their offices, and chat pleasantly of old times. Brown thinks they should be allowed to retain all their iron crosses, and even given some more, with which, after smart use of their pocket combs, they would cut no end of a dash among the nursemaids. As for the pipe, I was informed that it had now done its work, and I could take it away as a keepsake. I took it, but wondered...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236539583
  • 9781236539588