The Common Law Jurisdiction and Practice; According to Statutes and Decisions in the State of Illinois, from the Earliest Period to 1872. Embracing Historical, Analytical and Synthetical Views of the Jurisdiction, Forms of Volume 2

The Common Law Jurisdiction and Practice; According to Statutes and Decisions in the State of Illinois, from the Earliest Period to 1872. Embracing Historical, Analytical and Synthetical Views of the Jurisdiction, Forms of Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ... have some idea of the value of such property as is in general use; and it is not necessary to have adrover or butcher to prove the value of a cow. (j) In an action for damages for injuries to the body, a person not a physician is competent to testify that it was necessary for a physician to attend a patient as long as he did in fact attend him. (lc) When persons are engaged in any particular traflic, the presumption is that they are better acquainted with the value of the commodities in which they deal than the community generally. (Z) To render insurance agents competent to be called as experts, it should appear that in the course of their business they have acquired special knowledge upon the particular matter as to which they are called to testify. (m) In an action to recover for work and labor performed, where the plaintiff testified that he was to receive for his services "the custom of the country;" held, that the defendant could not be permitted to show what such services were worth, by a witness who did not profess to have any knowledge of the service claimed to have been performed, the kind thereof, or the manner of its performance. (n) 1. Contumacy--degree of punishment--action of the circuit court in respect thereto discretionary, and not subject to review in the appellate oourt. 2. What a deceased witness has testified to may be shown on a sub sequent trial.. Number of witnesses--more than four may be called to prove a given fact. ' Question to witness should not assume a fact not proved. A party may by his own oath lay the foundation for the introduc tion of secondary evidence. Evidence tending to show a liability should be completed and submitted. Insufficiency of evidence--may be excluded therefor after...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 318 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 572g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236780272
  • 9781236780270