Commercium Philosophico-Technicum, Or, the Philosophical Commerce of Arts; Designed as an Attempt to Improve Arts, Trades, and Manufactures

Commercium Philosophico-Technicum, Or, the Philosophical Commerce of Arts; Designed as an Attempt to Improve Arts, Trades, and Manufactures

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1763 edition. Excerpt: ...to the painter both in oil and water colours. Entire masses of it, laid in water, are also by degrees penetrated and disunited, though much more difficultly than those of white chalkIt appears, in effect, to be an earth of a quite differenf nature from common chalk, and seems to be rather of the slaty bituminous kind. In the fire it becomes white with; a reddim cast, and very friable; retaining its flaky structure, and looking much like the white flaky masses which some sorts of pitcoal leave in burning. Acid liquors neither dissolve, nor alter the colour of the black chalk itself; nor have they, so far as I could observe, any sensible action upon the white ashes. U u Our Our colour shops are said to be supplied with this useful earth from Italy and Germany; though some parts of England afford substances, nearly, if not entirely, of the fame quality, and which are found to be equally serviceable, both for marking and as black paints-Such particularly is the black earthy substance called Killow; said by Dr. Merrett, in his Pinax rerum Britannicaritm, to be found in Lancashire; and by Mr. Da Costa, in his history of fossils, to be plentiful on the side, near the top, of Cay-Avon, an high hill in Merionethshire. The killow has somewhat of a bluish or purplish cast mixed with its blackness, as the black chalk likewise has: hence it is named by Merrett blue marking stone, lapis caruleus killow diBus ducendis lineis idoneus. There is a harder and softer kind of it, killoia duriuscula et molliuscula of Woodward's method of fossils. II. Pitcoal. From the deep glossy black colour of some of the common sorts of pitcoal, I was induced to make trial of them as paints: their affinity to oils, in virtue of their bituminous nature, promised also some...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 202 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236638786
  • 9781236638786