Commercial Statistics; A Digest of the Productive Resources, Commercial Legislation, Customs Tariffs, Navigation, Port, and Quarantine Laws, and Charg

Commercial Statistics; A Digest of the Productive Resources, Commercial Legislation, Customs Tariffs, Navigation, Port, and Quarantine Laws, and Charg

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...at the time of the ice breaking, blow from the south-east, the ice is driven against the sandhills, and the depth over the bar is often greatly lessened. During one spring it was shallowed to only seven feet depth. Ships requiring a large draft of water can pass over the bar, but must load in part without in the roads; where the anchorage is only tolerable, and dangerous with strong north, and north-west winds, which have driven ships ashore; when the winds blow from the eastward, the rafts of wood brought out to be shipped are often driven from the vessels into the Baltic. The port charges have always been moderate, consisting chiefly of pilotage, loading, and ballast charges. The navigation generally closes about the middle or latter end of December (when severe frost sets in), and opens about the latter end of March. The legal monies, weights, and measures are now those of the realm. Memel owes its importance to its situation, and to the river of that name, which takes its rise in the forest highlands between Wilna and Minsk, in Russia, and it falls into the Courisk or Curriske Haff, after dividing itself into two arms, about sixty miles south of Memel. The Memel in its course receives at Kowna the Wilna, which takes its rise not far from where the Beresinski canal joins the Dwina and the Dnieper. The river of most consequence falling into the Memel is the Szecara, which runs by Slonino, and unites the Baltic and the Black Seas, through the canal of Oginsky. This canal lies within the division of Poland, which is under Russia, and will be more properly noticed when we treat of that empire. Memel has been, and continues to be, chiefly important, on account of its trade in Timber. This trade was of little value until 1764, from that time it has...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 510 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 903g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236616804
  • 9781236616807