The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom; Considered in Their Various Uses to Man and in Their Relation to the Arts and Manufactures...

The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom; Considered in Their Various Uses to Man and in Their Relation to the Arts and Manufactures...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ... between the tropics, where the natives cultivate it as producing the most nutricious fruit of its kind. Cargoes of the fruit are frequently exported from Surinam and Demerara. On the Spanish art of the American continent, land is measured by frmegas, each fanega con-aining twelve quarrces, and each quarree five and one-fifth English acres. A quarree measures one hundred geometrical paces, or three hundred square feet. In the first instance, the suckers of the plantain (the tree being propagated by cuttings or suckers which shoot up from the bulb), should be set at ten feet distance from each other; this proposition gives 300 plants on one line of trees, or 900 on the surface of one quarree of land. Each plant propagates itself and gives upon an average ten trees of the same size and bearing. On one quarree of land, therefore, there would be 9,000 trees, yielding four pounds of fibre and one bunch of fruit each, which is 9,000 bunches of fruit, and 36,000 lbs. nett of fibre, in the whole. In good ground the same plant will last fifteen years without any further trouble. Flat lands ought to be cultivated in preference to any other. The plantain thrives with the root in the water, and the head to the sun. On the borders of the river Orinoco it grows to the height of twenty feet, is one foot in diameter, and the stalks of the branches are three inches in 0utt'ng.--The tree which has not produced its ripe fruit ought to be cut, for two reasons--first, that the fruit be not lost; and secondly, that the tree will not have arrived at its full growth and ordinary size, and the fibres will be too tender. In cutting it down, take it off six inches above the surface of the ground, then divide it longitudinally into four parts, take out the heart, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 354 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 630g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236790030
  • 9781236790033