Commercial Precedents Selected from the Column of Replies and Decisions of the New York Journal of Commerce; An Essential Work of Reference for Every Business Man

Commercial Precedents Selected from the Column of Replies and Decisions of the New York Journal of Commerce; An Essential Work of Reference for Every Business Man

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...use oil for lights, or have any combustibles in the house they occupy, or are experimenting with anything classed extra or specially hazardous. A. There is a form of policy for the benefit of a mortgagee, which insures against fire, no matter what the occupant may do; but we know of no such engagement for the benefit of a landlord as against the violation of the terms of the policy by his tenant. 11. A party has rented by the year an apartment in a flat house. At the time of signing the lease the water flowed abundantly, both cold and hot, in the kitchen and bath room. For some time no hot water can be had, and it looks as though the cold water was soon going to stop as well. Is such a nuisance to be classed among the acts of God, without recourse against the landlord, who must of course feel annoyed, but helpless? or can the landlord be made to share his part of this dispensation, in the shape of a reduction in the rent, which he has been getting in consideration of advantages which existed at the time of making the lease, but which do not exist any longer? Can the tenant throw up his lease? Can the landlord be compelled to furnish such additional pumps as are needed to force the water in the kitchen and in the bath room? The lease expressly says that the landlord is to keep the water pipes in order. A. The landlord promised to keep the pipes in order, but is not responsible for the pressure of water furnished by the Croton water department. If the latter were to give out to-morrow, the leases of householders in the city would not thereby be vacated. 12. Is a landlord under all circumstances responsible for damage to merchandise caused by rain water, the roof of the building being defective, and the landlord having been notified thereof? Who...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 232 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 422g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236667794
  • 9781236667793