Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Proximate Analytical Examination, and Modes of Assaying the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, with Concise Volume 2, PT. 3

Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Proximate Analytical Examination, and Modes of Assaying the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, with Concise Volume 2, PT. 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...of American turpentine oil, has the same specific gravity,2 boiling-point, and chemical characters as the pinene from the French oil, differing from the latter substance solely in the direction of its optical rotation. Eucalyptene, laurene, massoyene, and olibene are mixtures of terpenes containing more or less pinene. It is very difficult if not impossible to obtain perfectly pure pinene from natural essential oils. A chemically pure substance 1 Pinenes also form notable proportions of the oils from the Guayana laurel, mace, sweet flag, cheken leaves, and bay leaves. Pinenes exist in smaller proportions in a great number of essential oils, including those from the juniper berry, Russian turpentine, Pinus pumilio, laurel, massoy, citron, fennel, myrtle, sage, valerian, hazel-wort, and eucalyptus. 2 According to W. A. Tilden, dextro-pinene from American turpentine oil has the following specific gravity: --0 / 4 = 0.8765; 25 / 25 = 0.8586; 100/100 = 0.8278. closely resembling the natural pinenes, but optically inactive, is obtained by heating pinene nitroso-chloride with aniline: --C10H16NOC1 + 2C6H5 NH2 = H20 + C6H5N2. CeEU. NH2 + C10H16 + HCL Pinene Nitroso-Aniline. Amido-azo-ben2ene. Pinene. chloride Pinene is nearly insoluble in water and aqueous liquids, but dissolves with facility in strong alcohol, and is miscible in all proportions with ether, chloroform, carbon disulphide, hydrocarbons, and fixed oils. Pinene distils unchanged at 155 to 156 under the ordinary atmospheric pressure, and is readily volatile in a current of open steam. When heated in a sealed tube for several hours to about 300, pinene yields a product formerly called iso-terebentene, which is so oxidisable that it is converted into a viscid mass on exposure to the air for a few.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236558995
  • 9781236558992