Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Proximate Analytical Examination, and Modes of Assaying the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, &C. with Concise Volume 3, PT. 2

Commercial Organic Analysis; A Treatise on the Properties, Proximate Analytical Examination, and Modes of Assaying the Various Organic Chemicals and Products Employed in the Arts, Manufactures, Medicine, &C. with Concise Volume 3, PT. 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...never chews coca leaves alone; but mixes them with ashes and lime, whereby the alkaloid is liberated, and thus obtains the anesthetic properties and numbing effect upon the mucous membrane of the stomach which he desires. In addition to the alkaloids in the above list, deuteropine, opionine, papaverosine, and porphyroxine (page 330) have been described, but their existence as individuals is very doubtful. With one or two exceptions, the alkaloids of opium are strictly peculiar to Papaver gomniferum; while, on the other hand, the poisonous alkaloid sanguinarine, which is present in all other papaveraceous plants, does not appear to exist in Papaver.1 Indeed, with the exception of protopine, which is probably identical with the interesting alkaloid macleyine, CjoHjgNOg, obtained by E y k m a n (Year-Book Pharm., 1882, p. 33) from 1 Sanguinarine, CHNO, is best prepared from the root of Sanguinaria Canadensis (Year-Book Pharm., 1871, 310; 1875, 256; 1879, 201). The root is exhausted with water acidulated with acetic acid, the solution precipitated by ammonia, the precipitate dried and exhausted with ether, and the ethereal solution treated with hydrochloric acid gas, which throws down the hydrochloride of sanguinarine (BHC1 + H20) as a scarlet precipitate, which may be purified by solution in hot water and repetition of the treatment with ammonia, ether, 4c. The free alkaloid melts at 160, and crystallises from hot alcohol in small white needles having an acrid, burning taste. Sanguinarine is a powerful narcotic poison; the powder causes sneezing. It is insoluble in water, but soluble in ether, chloroform, amylic alcohol, benzene and petroleum spirit. The solutions exhibit a strong violet fluorescence without absorption-bands, and arc optically...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 236 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123665269X
  • 9781236652690